Greenebaum Cancer Center Recognizes Compassion, Humility in Two Staff Members

Two University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center staff members were recently honored with 2015 Greenebaum Compassion Awards.  Medical assistant Heather Thomas and clinical nurse Thi Nguyen, RN, were nominated by their coworkers for exemplifying the qualities of compassion and humanitarianism while providing care for their patients.

Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum, for whom the Cancer Center is named, established the special award in 2007 to recognize staff members who go well beyond their normal duties and demonstrate extraordinary compassion, hope and dignity.

Thomas, a medical assistant at the Stoler Outpatient Lymphoma clinic, received not just one nomination, but four. Sharon Otto, RN, Seung Tae Lee, MD, Jennifer Cash, RN, and Arnob Banerjee, MD, PhD, all described Thomas as willing to go the extra mile for her patients, no matter the circumstances. She has been known to call patients to see how they are feeling or even simply to wish them a Happy Birthday.

“[Thomas] anticipates their needs and really makes them feel understood and cared for,” Cash says. “She will stop whatever she is doing if a patient stops her to see if she can help them. She is a wonderful team player, and I have never heard her say ‘no’ to anyone.”

Otto describes Thomas as the “epitome of calmness” and adds “our patients, our staff and the physicians all feel safe and comforted when Heather is involved.”

Nguyen works in the Greenebaum Cancer Center’s aphaeresis lab , providing treatments such as stem cell collection, photophoresis and leukodepletion. Nominated by Kathy Holden, RN, Nguyen inspires her coworkers to strive for the outstanding level of commitment, empathy and passion she displays on a daily basis. Holden says Nguyen is always looking for ways to make her patients’ procedures more effective and less taxing. Her passion for healing goes beyond her written job description.

“During conversations about the sometimes long hours and overtime, Thi has expressed to me: ‘I don’t care about that. I think about the patient and how they need that to survive, so I will do it. I don’t even care if I get paid,’” Holden says.

Nguyen’s concern for the patient’s welfare also doesn’t go unnoticed by those she helps treat. Holden says she has seen patients with tears in their eyes, thanking Nguyen for “saving their lives.”  Nguyen also becomes “overwhelmed with heartbreak” when a client has complications, and “noticeably rejoices with them for reaching milestones for recovery.”

Greenebaum Cancer Center staff members nominate their own colleagues for the annual Compassion Awards, are nominated by and a committee representing various Cancer Center departments selects the winners. As award recipients, Nguyen and Thomas each received a $2,500 cash award, and had their names added to the Compassion Award display in the Stoler Pavilion waiting area.

Safe Summer Skin

By: Adrian Rabin, Editorial Intern

For many, the beginning of summer means spending lots of time outdoors. It’s tempting to spend full days outside enjoying the sunshine, but long hours spent in the sun can damage your skin, especially without proper protection.

One in five Americans will develop skin cancer throughout their lifetime, and the Skin Cancer Foundation reports that around 90% of non-melanoma skin cancers and 60% of melanoma skin cancers are directly linked to exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun.

Although invisible to the naked eye, the sun’s UV rays can permeate deep into the layers of the skin, damaging the DNA housed inside skin cells. Damaged cells in the deepest layers of the skin can lead to melanoma, the most aggressive type of skin cancer with the highest tendency to spread. Non-melanoma cancers arise from damage to cells closer to the skin’s surface.

A single sunburn can significantly increase your risk of skin cancer. After five sunburns, the risk of developing melanoma doubles.

Fortunately, the most significant way to reduce this risk is within our control. Scientific research provides powerful evidence that daily sunscreen use can greatly reduce the risk of skin cancer.

The Skin Cancer Program at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center offers these tips as guidelines for summer skin safety:

Stay out of the sun. The most dangerous hours of the day are between 10:00 am – 2:00 pm, so try to plan outdoor activities for the early morning or later afternoon. Cover yourself with sun-protective clothing and sunglasses, and seek shade whenever possible.

Use sunscreens labeled as broad spectrum and high SPF. Broad spectrum sunscreens protect against harmful UVA and UVB rays. UVA rays permeate deep into the skin, while UVB rays cause the skin to redden and burn. The Sun Protection Factor, or SPF, is the direct measure of how effective a sunscreen is against the sun’s UV rays. Choose a sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher for optimal protection.

Apply sunscreen thoroughly and frequently. During continued exposure to the sun, reapply sunscreen to exposed skin every two hours, and always after swimming or sweating.

Think about the everyday. Don’t skip the sunscreen even if the forecast is partly cloudy–on cloudy days, over 40% of UV rays can still reach earth. For everyday activities, adults and children over 6 months should wear moisturizers or lotions with SPF 15 or higher, which can prevent skin damage from moderate sun exposure.

Never use UV tanning beds. The rays emitted by these machines can be over 12 times stronger than the sun’s natural rays.

Examine your skin every month for abnormalities. Spots or sores that are asymmetrical, growing, or do not go away within two weeks should all be examined by a physician

No sunscreen can block all UV rays, but with proper application and maintenance, you can significantly reduce your risk of skin cancer while enjoying the activities you love and keeping your skin healthy.

For more information, visit the Skin Cancer Program at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center.

Compassion and Healing

The Greenebaum Compassion Award goes this winter to Lisa Mayo, a discharge coordinator, and Michelle “Shelle” Besche, BSN, OCN, CCRP, a research nurse coordinator. Read about why they were chosen from among the staff of the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center — where everyone is known for compassionate care.

Greenebaum Cancer Center Patients and Staff Celebrate Together

Each year, the staff of the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center coordinates “A Cancer Center Christmas,” a buffet dinner and party for patients and families who must celebrate Christmas in the hospital.

 A deep bond develops among the cancer center “family,” as patients and the relatives and friends who support them make frequent trips for care during this crucial period in their lives. On the day after this year’s Christmas celebration, Peggy Torr, BSN, RN, OCN, a nurse who helped coordinate this year’s celebration, sent staff an email that perfectly illustrates the warm and loving atmosphere created by these nurses, patient care technicians, unit secretaries, physicians and other staff. 

Torr noted that much credit should go to her colleague, Anita Meddin, RN, who over the years helped organize the annual celebration and make it better each time. 

 

 

Recovering Cancer Patient Takes Control of Health and Weight

Verna Prehn, before and after

My Story of Getting Healthy

By Verna Prehn

Three years ago I was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. At the time of my diagnosis, I was a very large woman (weighing more than 300 lbs) with a very high “at-rest” heart rate and (we would find out later) severely malnourished.

I went through tough but successful treatment, including two surgeries, chemotherapy, artificial feedings with a nasogastric tube, and blood transfusions, under the care of Dr. Sarah Temkin at the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center.

Chemo had many side effects, including bone pain, hair loss and weight loss (97 pounds), but it has successfully freed me from cancer for now, and Dr. Temkin keeps a close watch on my health, vigilant for a recurrence that would require additional treatment. Dr. Temkin told me that keeping the weight off that I had lost with chemotherapy treatments would be healthy for me and increase my survivorship.

After treatment was complete, I began to put on weight, but Dr. Temkin said not to worry too much because everyone puts on a bit of weight after they have completed treatment. But my little bit of weight became a lot more weight until I had put on all 97 pounds I had lost.

I went to Dr. Tais Baig in UM Family Medicine as my primary care physician to have her regulate medication for my high blood pressure and rapid heart rate. She ran tests and found that my blood glucose was high enough to suspect diabetes. Dr. Baig talked with me for a while, getting to know me and asked how she could best help me with my health.

I told her that I wanted to get the weight off because I wanted to increase my survivorship and I knew that being so heavy is a threat to my health. I told her that I didn’t know how to do it. I don’t know what good nutrition is, what’s good or bad to eat, and how to come up with a plan to lose weight. She told me about the University of Maryland Medical Weight Management Program through the Department of Family and Community Medicine. Dr. Baig helped me through getting an appointment to begin.

I met Dr. Verlyn Warrington at my first appointment. She explained the program, gave me lots of information and set me up for the group meetings with a licensed clinical social worker and behavior therapist. I was taking medication for high blood pressure and rapid heart rate, thyroid medication for an under active thyroid, an inhaler for asthma, and Dr. Warrington wanted to put me on medication for diabetes.

My first meeting with the support and accountability group was overwhelming. We talked about protein, protein, protein. We talked about portion size. We talked about eating several times a day and not skipping meals. Harriet told us that if we followed the plan we would lose 10 percent of our body weight in three months. It took me about a week-and-a-half before I gave the plan a try because I was afraid and overwhelmed. In three months, I did indeed lose 10 percent of my body weight. In fact, I lost 35 pounds that first three months.

Additionally, Dr. Warrington explained that I needed to increase my activity level. I had some restrictions on what I could do because of my knees and asthma. I began walking. I started walking around the perimeter of my neighborhood, which measures out to just over a mile. At first, I couldn’t walk and talk at the same time and I had to stop frequently to rest and catch my breath. As I have lost more weight and have increased my cardiovascular endurance, I have started exercising to on-line walking videos

I have learned so much from Harriet, Dr. Warrington, Dr. Vivienne Rose and the people in our support and accountability group. I know how to think and make good choices about eating. HALT is a good motto to follow because my emotions drive my eating habits. So I think: HALT – am I HUNGRY? Or am I ANGRY? or am I LONELY? or am I TIRED? Actually, I add an “S” to it (HALTS) – am I STRESSED?

I read the labels on food and check them for calories, fat and sugar content. I measure my food so that I keep healthy portion sizes. (Portion size was a huge surprise to me. I had an unrealistic concept of what an individual serving was and what was actually food for two or three people.)

I keep track of my food in a food journal through MyFitnessPal.com. It also keeps track of my exercise and activity level. Dr. Warrington told me about this tool to use because I had gone about two months and had only lost one pound. Dr. Warrington and the food journal help me to realize that I was eating too few calories – I wasn’t eating enough food.

Dr. Vivienne Rose and Harriet Mandel present Mrs. Verna Prehn with a congratulatory plaque marking her 100 pound weight loss

Dr. Vivienne Rose and Harriet Mandel present Mrs. Verna Prehn with a congratulatory plaque marking her 100 pound weight loss

 

It has been 14 months since Dr. Warrington, Dr. Rose and Harriet helped me make a lifestyle change that is healthier for me and increases my rate of survivorship. At my last appointment and weigh-in, I had lost 100 pounds. It took 13 months. I am no longer on medication for my heart or blood pressure or thyroid. My blood glucose is no longer in the diabetic or pre-diabetic range. I have walked two 8k walks. I walk to videos or outdoors five times a week. I do strength training exercises with weights and bands. I am starting a faith and fitness class with a trainer and will begin a gym membership soon. I can walk my entire neighborhood in 20 minutes without stopping and while carrying on a conversation at the same time.

I still have a considerable amount of weight to lose to get to a healthy weight that I am comfortable with. I feel so much better already. I take the steps instead of the elevator and it doesn’t hurt my knees! I know so much more about what is a healthy food choice and portion size. The University of Maryland Medical Weight Management program, Dr. Warrington, Dr. Rose and Harriet have helped me claim a new healthier way of living.

Verna Prehn

Elkridge, Md.

Spreading Love and Unity in The Breast Center at UMMC

By Tiesha Dove, CMA

Certified Medical Assistant, The Breast Center

Here at The Breast Center at UMMC, many of our patients come in once a year or so for a screening mammogram and soon receive a letter confirming everything looks normal. But others find themselves dealing with the harsh reality of cancer, and we do our best to care for them throughout their treatment. We always want to help in any way we can, even if it’s just with a smile. Our staff members are supportive of one another as we support patients, and that’s how the Valentine’s Day sock exchange came to be.

Who knew that a simple pair of socks would bring so much happiness? The sock exchange started out as a random act of kindness. I always wear crazy socks because they’re fun and brighten up my day. When my co-worker, Stephanie Jackson, noticed and admired my socks one day, it sparked the idea to spread the joy of crazy socks. On Valentine’s Day.

Just like with a “secret Santa” drawing, everyone in our office drew names and then each bought a pair of crazy socks for the person whose name she drew. We exchanged the socks on Valentine’s Day during our lunch hour, and then we all agreed to wear them the next day, showing them off to our patients and spreading love and unity within our Breast Center community.

And, by the way, we decided that the sock exchange will be an annual event.

Pictured above are, from left to right: Regina Pinkey-Gillespie, Stephanie Jackson, Danita Biles, Tiesha Dove, Kam Finckel, Gayle Sis, Lynne Randolph, Esther Jackson, Barbara Myers and Dornette Brown.

Mid-Term Fall Nutrition: Easy as ABC

By Mindy Athas, RD, CSO, LDN

Outpatient Oncology Dietitian

Has that initial back-to-school resolution to pack healthier lunches and make more nutritious choices throughout the day started to wear thin? Have autumn tasks and responsibilities and pre-holiday stress led you down the junk food trail? It’s time to get back into healthy habits before the festivities and post-holiday winter hibernation kick in.  So grab your notebook, pencil and calculator, and meet me for some Nutrition 101.

Reading: start gathering healthy recipes from friends, family, books, magazines and online sites. Two great resources for healthy eating include www.cookinglight.com and www.eatingwell.com.  Head to the book store for the bargain cookbooks and look for words like “low-fat”, “heart-healthy” and “light or lite” recipes.  Or stop by the library and grab a handful of healthy eating cookbooks to peruse; if you find some keepers, you can always order the books online.  Cooking magazines include Cooking Light, Cooks Illustrated, and Bon Appétit, all of which also have online sites.  For more general healthy reading, check out www.eatright.org, www.mayoclinic.com, www.heart.org and www.diabetes.org, all of which have printable general information handouts geared to the basics.

 For more detailed info and healthy eating plates and pyramids, see www.choosemyplate.gov, www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/ and oldwayspt.org/resources/heritage-pyramids/mediterranean-pyramid/overview.  

You may want to start an online or paper recipe journal or folder to keep all your healthy fall picks in one place.  For specific cancer-fighting foods, check out American Institute for Cancer Research’s www.aicr.org/foods-that-fight-cancer/ , for a list of nutrition fact sheets, see the National Cancer Institute’s www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/diet  and the American Cancer Society’s www.cancer.org/Healthy/EatHealthyGetActive/index for cancer prevention nutrition strategies.

Writing: Jot down some weekly dinner ideas to help organize your food shopping list.  Start with protein but add in at least one meatless meal: good for your budget, your waistline and the environment!  Meatless meals can include beans, nuts, tofu or just a mixture of grains (think bean chili and pasta marinara).  Animal protein includes poultry, fish, eggs, and lean cuts of meats, but limit red and processed meats as much as possible. Then add vegetables (seasonal and local items should top the list), and finally a starch (if you even need one with all the wonderful root vegetables in season now).  Add fruit for a quick and easy dessert.

Check your local food stores’ weekly flyers for sales, which will change often, ensuring a nice food variety while helping you save money.  For some meal and menu ideas: www.makedinnereasy.com which includes a weekly grocery list to print, www.dinnerplanner.com with step-by-step photos and tips, www.health.com/health/eating  which includes a free email newsletter, and www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/index.html which has an A to Z foods list.

Remember to cut back on salt and salty ingredients and increase the amount of fruits or vegetables in the recipes.  Always aim to keep the base of your meal coming from plants: veggies, fruits, beans, nuts and whole grains.  Eat a rainbow of colors daily as well to ensure you get a myriad of different nutrients.  

School  Supplies: When making your fall food list, stick with some basics to keep in your kitchen all season. These include good quality olive oil (extra virgin), canola oil (expeller-pressed), balsamic vinegar (or red wine vinegar if you prefer), fresh garlic (don’t refrigerate), fresh herbs (which you can buy as plants and keep in a sunny window), dried herbs (curry powder, cinnamon, cumin), shallots and onions (organic if you can get them), a pepper mill for fresh ground pepper, and any other herbs and spices you like. 

Cutting back on salt at home will help you lower your salt threshold for when you eat out, encouraging better restaurant choices. Remember to pick what’s in season now, in your area:  in addition to a variety of apples, look for local pumpkins, gourds, pears, beans, turnips, sweet potatoes, broccoli, and honey.  Try acorn or butternut squash simply baked with some olive oil or real Maple syrup (which you can also buy locally and which is considered an antioxidant). 

For more seasonal eating information:, see Sustainable Table at www.sustainabletable.org/shop/seasonal/ , the Natural Resources Defense Council www.simplesteps.org/contact which has an Eat Local app for your phone, www.marylandsbest.net  which includes a listing of local markets and farms, and www.pickyourown.org/MDharvestcalendar.htm which has a complete annual harvest chart.  Taking a trip on a beautiful fall day to pick apples off the tree combines exercise, fun and sustainable eating: that’s putting your money where your mouth is!

New Teacher: don’t be afraid to try new foods! Check out the plethora of gourds, pumpkins, root vegetables, and colorful fruits showcased at the farmers’ markets this fall.  Don’t know what it is? Buy it and try it: your farmer or grocer will get you started. (Did you bring your recipe notebook?) Write down the names of unusual foods (Parsnip? Dragon fruit? Fiddleheads? Lychee?) so you can search recipes later.  Haven’t tried brown rice, amaranth, quinoa or chia seeds yet? Don’t be a flunky: get hip to the multitude of whole grains available at almost every supermarket.  Look for the words “100% whole”, “whole wheat,” “stone ground,” “multigrain” and “whole grain” on packages. Choose grains with the most fiber: aim for 3 grams per serving for breads and crackers, and 5 grams per serving for starches.  Fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts and seeds are also great fiber sources, and remember an apple for the teacher!  Some other nutrition superstars which always seem to be in season include mushrooms, beets, cauliflower, cabbage, carrots, Brussels sprouts, pomegranates, and kale.   For other great healthy food ideas: www.appforhealth.com/tag/healthiest-produce/ , www.whfoods.com/foodstoc.php and www.divinecaroline.com/22175/52070-twenty-healthiest-foods-1

A is for Autumn: Eat plenty of fresh (local and seasonal) produce this fall. Choose 3 or more servings of vegetables daily and 2 or more servings of fruit daily. This is equivalent to about 2 cups daily of fruits and veggies combined.   For details, see www.choosemyplate.gov/myplate/index.aspx

B is for Bread: think making your own bread is hard? You have mastered many difficult school subjects, so baking bread from scratch (or using your bread machine) is a veritable piece of cake!  Start with an easy basic recipe using a combo of all-purpose, bread and whole wheat flour.  Use up all those fresh apples and pears in muffins and fruit pies with added nuts to add healthy fats, fiber and protein.  Sprinkle in some oat bran or flax seed for crunch, and substitute some of the oil in the recipes with yogurt or applesauce.  Try this pear and granola muffin recipe from Martha Stewart, which includes whole grains and cinnamon: www.marthastewart.com/317980/pear-and-granola-muffins.   

C is for Cooking: Think how great your home will smell with a big pot of creamy butternut squash soup (yum!) on the stove. Throw in some cinnamon and the neighbors will be coming by.  Cook large batches of soup, stew, chili, casseroles, quiche, or tomato sauce. Cool in shallow dishes, then freeze in small glass containers for a quick dinner. Make chili with beans or try a white chili with ground turkey or chicken. 

If you’ve never had fresh beets, try: www.finecooking.com/recipes/jewel-roasted-vegetables.aspx?nterms=53248,50300. And for a low-carb pasta swap, try spaghetti squash instead, with turkey meatballs: www.wholeliving.com/131539/spaghetti-squash-turkey-meatballs?czone=/fall-recipes/main-courses&center=185179&gallery=185173&slide=131539.

For a twist on fresh pumpkin, consider a warm pumpkin salad over polenta: www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Warm-Pumpkin-Salad-with-Polenta-and-Candied-Pumpkin-Seeds-105581 or stick with the traditional soup: www.tasteofhome.com/Recipes/Curried-Pumpkin-Soup-2 where you can sub fresh pumpkins (look for the small round kind for cooking, not the big kind for carving at Halloween) instead of canned.

Watch your Math: Remember to watch portion sizes, added fats and sugars. With all the tasty fresh fall produce, you won’t need many calorie-rich condiments.  Cream, butter, excess oil, sweet sauces, salad dressings, cheese and fried items can easily overload your calorie budget.  Seek lower or no-sugar-added items and try making your own salad dressing with olive oil, vinegar and mustard or a squeeze of fresh lime juice.  Retrain your taste buds to appreciate the delicate flavors found naturally in fresh foods. Remember fresh garlic, shallots and onions in dishes for a pop of flavor and substitute fresh herbs for dried as able.  Use the plate method: half your plate (and try to use a smaller diameter plate) with vegetables and fruits, then ¼ whole grains and ¼ protein foods. For more ideas on adding produce: www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org.   Continue to add daily physical activity to your life: just walking 10 minutes after each meal can help keep your body healthy and relieve stress.  Try sleeping in a dark room at night for a solid 7- to 8-hour stretch and laughing more, both of which can strengthen your immune system.  For more healthy living ideas: www.fns.usda.gov/eatsmartplayhardhealthylifestyle/ and www.hhs.gov/safety/index.html.

Congratulations on passing your Mid-Term Fall Eating class: enjoy all of autumn’s bounty, and it’s OK to encourage others to copy.

 

Ringing in Hope for Cancer Patients

For David Taylor, ringing the bell on the wall in the main waiting area of the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center marked the end of 42 days of radiation treatments for prostate cancer – and the beginning of a new chapter in his life.

The Department of Radiation Oncology treats nearly 1,000 patients at the cancer center each year. Several times a day, the waiting area erupts in cheers and applause as patients, joined by family members and radiation oncology staff, ring the bell to celebrate their final day of radiation treatment.

Read the entire story here

Pediatric Leukemia Patient Raises Funds for Second Year in a Row

Brasen

Brasen VonMoose-Lemin

Editor’s Note: Brasen’s second fundraiser was a success –he raised $2,756 for the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital! See pictures of Brasen presenting the check to UMCH pediatric oncologist Dr. Teresa York.

My name is Brasen VonMoose-Lemin. I am a 7-year old who has won the battle with leukemia. I am planning my second fundraiser for my hospital, the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital on May 19. Last year I raised over $1880 and this year I’d like to raise even more than that (see my story from last year).

I plan to sell lemonade and other sweet treats with the help of my family members.

My plan is to raise money to help children who are fighting cancer. I will continue this journey every year until they find a cure and no child will have to suffer through the pain, hospitalization, chemo, spinal taps and so much more.

My fundraiser and raffle will take place on May 19th 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at my school parking lot, George T. Cromwell Elementary School at 525 Wellham Ave, Glen Burnie MD. The rain date will be May 20th.

A few local grocery stores will donate baked goods. In addition we will have several raffles including movie basket, Thirty-One basket, Scrapbook Basket, Longaberger, and more. I also plan to have some special characters arriving including balloon characters, and we’ll also offer face painting and glitter tattoos.

This year’s event is extra special to me since I have been chemo-free since November 2011. We are hoping you will come out and join my cause in the fight in helping children with cancer. Checks will be accepted and can be made payable to the UMMS Foundation.

For information regarding the fundraiser or the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital, please contact Jennifer Summers at 410-328-9546 or jsummers@umm.edu
You can also visit the Children’s Hospital Web site at www.umm.edu/pediatrics.

How Cool is That?

Being chosen as a Leapfrog “Top Hospital” for quality and safety six years in a row is so cool that the only way to celebrate was with ice cream.

UMMC is one of only two hospitals in the country to meet the increasingly stringent criteria for this list every year since it was initiated by The Leapfrog Group.

To thank the entire staff for the effort that makes UMMC a top hospital, President and CEO Jeffrey A. Rivest invited everyone to take an ice cream break during their shifts and to savor the moment. In the Weinberg Atrium, members of the Employee Celebrations Team handed out ice cream bars and cones and frozen-fruit bars to staff – as well as to several patients and visitors who happened to be in the right place at the right time.

“UMMC has earned this continual recognition by The Leapfrog Group because of the multidisciplinary teams that define us and the invaluable members who comprise these teams — doctors, nurses, pharmacists, therapists, technicians, support staff and leaders at all levels,” Rivest said. “Thank you for the role you play in continuing to make safety and quality a top priority and for giving all of us yet another reason to be proud. Take a moment to celebrate your part in earning this award for the Medical Center.”