A Gift of Thanks – 3 Years (and 43 Surgeries) Later

Grant (second from right) with part of the STC team and his parents

Three years ago, Grant Harrison was in a horrific motorcycle crash.  It was a bright sunny day on the Eastern Shore when a large deer struck the motorcycle Grant was riding.  He was airlifted to UMMC’s R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center with multiple life threating injuries.

The fact that he is alive today is nothing short of astonishing. Grant had a fractured skull, severe traumatic brain injury, bleeding of the brain and severe injuries to his limbs.

Grant spent 58 days on the Neurotrauma Critical Care Unit, and has had 43 surgeries on his road to recovery.

Grant is a now a walking, talking (and hilarious) miracle.

Exactly three years after the accident, June 6, 2017, Grant, along with his mother and father, wanted to give thanks to the nurses and doctors at Shock Trauma who showed them extraordinary compassion and care throughout this life-altering experience.

They brought the Shock Trauma team a framed thank you letter, along with photos documenting Grant’s journey to recovery.  The gift is now hung along the walls of the Neurotrauma Critical Care Unit, right outside the Patient Family Waiting Area.

The Harrison Family hopes that families pacing those halls (like they did many times 3 years ago), will read the testimony and find hope and encouragement.

Read a portion of the family’s letter below:

“The doctors and nurses here not only care for the patient, but for you, the family as well. They will always hold a special place in our hearts for their kindness and compassion. We encourage you to listen well to them, as they will educate and guide you through this unexpected journey. The Trauma Survivor’s Network, a resource offered through the hospital, was also most helpful to us.”

Grant with TRU Nurse Christopher Wentker

 

Brain Injury Awareness Month

By Jameson Roth, Communications Intern

At UMMC, we recognize individuals who have experienced Traumatic Brain Injury, directly and indirectly, throughout the month of March with the acknowledgment of Brain Injury Awareness Month.

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is defined as a complex injury caused by an outside force on the brain, which can result in the permanent or temporary loss of brain functions. Individuals who have survived a TBI may experience symptoms such as memory loss, impaired cognition, headaches and mood swings following their injury.

The leading causes of TBI include motor vehicle crashes, said Karen McQuillan, lead clinical nursing specialist at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center. As a 30-year veteran of trauma nursing, McQuillan has seen it all. Other causes of TBI include sports activity, physical assault, gunshot wounds, domestic violence and falls. “Falls dominate the cause category for individuals aged 65 and over for TBI,” McQuillan said.

McQuillan is an active proponent of TBI prevention tactics. To prevent TBI in individuals age 65 or older, McQuillan suggests removing floor obstacles and installing wall railings in home hallways and bathrooms. One way to prevent motor vehicle crash-related TBI is by putting a stop to distracted driving. “A motor vehicle crash is 23 times more likely while texting,” McQuillan said. For individuals who ride bikes or drive motorcycles, McQuillan suggests wearing a helmet for head protection.

While not all individuals diagnosed with TBI make a full recovery, McQuillan suggests for an optimal recovery:

  • When appropriate, formalized rehabilitation
  • Plenty of rest
  • Reliance upon a strong support system
  • Patient-specific cognition activities to help patients overcome deficits

To learn more about the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center’s role in TBI recovery, please visit http://umm.edu/programs/shock-trauma/patients/survivors-network