Redwood Pharmacy Moves to a More Prominent Location

By Jeffrey Cywinski, RPh

UMMC Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Manager

You could say the new UMMC Pharmacy at Redwood has taken the community by storm. Although Hurricane Sandy threatened our neighborhood with flooding and high winds on our opening day Oct. 29, pharmacist Charles Donohue, RPh, and pharmacy technician Vernette Neely stepped up to open the pharmacy in its new location despite the hostile weather.

Our newly designed and easily accessible pharmacy has been relocated to the corner of Paca and Redwood streets — across the street from the Redwood Building. It’s open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. The pharmacy includes an expanded prescription processing area and a larger variety of over-the-counter products for our patients.

The new storefront entrance also means quick access for staff and students throughout the University of Maryland Baltimore campus, and for West Side residents and others who work or shop in the neighborhood.

Pharmacy technician Shawnta Toney stocks the empty shelves with topicals at the new pharmacy.

Moving a pharmacy is a complex endeavor that requires attention to detail. Support from other departments is also crucial.

Because an extra layer of security is necessary when moving controlled substances, the Baltimore City Police, University of Maryland Campus Police, and UMMC security officers ensured safe passage for the medications from one building to the other.

The relocation involved more than 12 total hours with the assistance of about 30 staff members, which included a team of pharmacy technicians and pharmacists, assisted by Bret Elam, pharmacy business and operations manager, and Marc Summerfield, MS, director of Pharmacy Services for UMMC.

Everyone had a specific role. The technicians stocked shelves and organized the pharmacy supplies, while the pharmacists performed inventory counts on narcotics and controlled substances.

Our pharmacy department is known for using innovative technology: The Script Pro Robot counts over 40 percent of prescriptions filled and the Omnicell securely stores narcotic medications and documents any access to them. The Pharmacy IT team connected the point-of-sale cash registers and the rest of the technology. We also had the support of Agnes Ann Feemster, PharmD, assistant director of clinical pharmacy and investigational drug services, and Deborah Fay, project manager.

Thanks to our dedicated staff and partners, we were able to finish the move ahead of time.

We’re here for you. Whether you need to fill a prescription or just buy a bottle of OTC headache medicine, come visit us on the corner of Paca and Redwood streets!

UMMC Using New ID Application to Check Crash Carts

By Sharon Boston, UMMC Media Relations Manager

 

You may know RFID (radio frequency identification) as a theft prevention system in libraries and stores. It’s also used for key cards and to check the stock of some hotel mini-bars.

The University of Maryland Medical Center is now the first hospital to use a new application of RFID technology to scan the content of hospital crash carts, which carry medications that are critical during life-threatening emergencies.

The system, called Kit Check, scans an opened crash cart tray in about 10 seconds, identifying medications that are missing or will expire soon. The pharmacist then restocks the tray and scans it again in the specially designed scanning station (which looks a small cabinet or pizza oven) to verify that all items are present and up-to-date.

Want to see it in action? Check out the video at the top of this post.

Each medication has an RFID tag, allowing the entire tray to be scanned and verified quickly, virtually eliminating the chance for human error and removing the need to hand-check each tray twice.