Sofia’s Lemonade Stand

Sofia Joslin, a seven year Patterson Park native and daughter of child life manager Shannon Joslin, has raised an incredible amount of money to support the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital. Sofia decided that the day her neighborhood was having a large scale yard sale day (3 blocks long), she would use the opportunity to help give back to kids who may not be as fortunate as herself.

Sofia (left) and her friend pose with their lemonade stand they used for their donation to UMCH

From there, Sofia gathered up her friends and they began to play a part in the process as well. Sofia and her friends sold all of their lemonade and raised $250 which made all the effort she put in a positive experience.

After the fundraiser’s huge success, Sofia was determined to donate toys  of all different diversities to the Children’s Hospital.

She sought help from her parents who were quick to remind her there are all types of kids at the hospital: she needed to find toys that both girls and boys of different ages would like. The family headed to Target to maximize the most they could out of $250.

Staying true to her word Sofia went shopping and stuck to the basics. She set out to get dolls, craft kits amongst other items for girls, and Legos and cars for the boys.

After Sofia and her family purchased the toys, they were collected in UMCH’s red wagon and transported to the hospital. Sofia got to see her work go full circle when her parents took her down to the hospital to deliver the toys in person.

Following such a positive turn out, Sofia’s neighborhood wants to ensure that this is not a one-time donation. Inspired by the children’s involvement and by UMCH’s great care, adults in the neighborhood would like to make this a tradition and make even bigger donations going forward.

Many thanks to Sofia, her family and neighbors! Your continued support of the Children’s Hospital ensures we have the resources available to make every patient’s stay comfortable and fun.

 

Learn more about the Child Life Program and meet the team.  http://www.umm.edu/childlife

Interested in giving to the Children’s Hospital? Here’s how you can help. http://www.umm.edu/programs/childrens/services/child-life/how-to-help

 

 

Celebrating the 46th Anniversary of the First Maryland State Police Medevac Mission: March 19, 1970

By Sergeant Chad Gainey; Maryland State Police Aviation Unit, Flight Paramedic

As we mark Saturday’s 46th anniversary of the first medevac mission completed by the Maryland State Police, we reflect on a few of the accomplishments the MSP Aviation Command has achieved.

The Maryland State Police Aviation Division medical mission profile began in November 1960 with the acquisition of a Hiller UH12E helicopter. This aircraft was used primarily for police missions, however a medical “support” profile was soon established and thus began the idea of medical evacuation for the citizens of Maryland.

medevac 1Although systematic medical care was not provided on board, this aircraft transported medical patients such as heart attack victims and expectant mothers following severe snowstorms. Medical rescues were performed with the Hiller as early as 1966, but not under a complete system of enroute care.

medevac 2Within a few years, that concept would come to life. Dr. R Adams Cowley, perhaps best known for being the father of the “Golden Hour” concept in trauma medicine, collaborated with MSP Pilot Robert Y. Wolfe and other Maryland leaders to close the most significant gap in trauma care.

medevac 3On March 19, 1970 at 11:20 am, the first “Medevac” was completed under a complete system of enroute medical care. Originally called “Helicopter 108”, pilot Corporal Gary Moore and Trooper First Class Paul Benson responded to a traffic accident on the Baltimore Beltway (Interstate 695) and Falls Road and transported a patient to what was then known as the Center for the Study of Trauma, now known as the University of Maryland R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, in a Turbine powered Bell Jet Ranger aircraft.

On that day, MSP formally expanded its role into the world of emergency medical services (EMS). That medevac mission marked the first time a civilian agency transported a critically injured trauma patient by helicopter; never before had this been done in a non-military setting.

Since that time, many changes have occurred to improve what today is called the Maryland State Police Aviation Command and the Maryland medevac system. MSP and Shock Trauma have earned a worldwide reputation as leaders in trauma care.

medevac 4The procurement of the AS365 Dauphin helicopters in the late 1980s provided additional enhancements for the fleet, such as increased speed, the added safety component of two engines, and additional space to accommodate two patients.

 

 

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In 2013, the Maryland State Police began flying the latest and greatest technology in the form of the AugustaWestland AW139 helicopters. Additional safety measures were incorporated, along with the addition of a second pilot and a second medical provider to the standard flight crew.

More than 148,000 patients have been transported since that day in March 1970. The Maryland State Police Aviation Command, in conjunction with other medical partners around the State, and with the continuing support of our citizens, their government representatives, and other stakeholders, have made the Maryland Medevac system a success story for many patients and their families.medevac photo 6

Poison Prevention Week: What You Need to Know

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By: Andrea Rizkallah, Editorial Intern

Poisoning can happen at any time, often from everyday household items, and frequently to children under the age of 5. Please make sure you and your loved ones save the Poison Help line phone number (1-800-222-1222) and following these tips provided by the Maryland Poison Center at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy and the Poison Prevention Week Council.

Here are some helpful prevention tips to stay poison-free:

  • Install safety latches on cabinets used for medicines and cleaning products.
  • Buy products in child-resistant packaging whenever possible.
  • Teach children to always ask an adult before eating, drinking or touching anything.
  • Never borrow a friend’s medicine or take old medicines.
  • Read the labels of prescription and over-the-counter medicine carefully and always consult a doctor if you have any questions.
  • Never combine household products, as some chemical mixtures may release irritating gases.
  • Wear protective clothing when spraying pesticides and other chemicals.
  • Install carbon monoxide detectors near or in your home’s sleeping areas and on every level of the home.

If you’ve taken all the above precautionary measures, but someone in your home has become poisoned anyway, follow these emergency tips:

  • If the person has inhaled poison, get him/her to fresh air right away.
  • If the person has poison on the skin, take off any clothing on the affected area and rinse the skin with running water for 15 to 20 minutes.
  • If the person has poison in the eyes, rinse eyes with running water for 15 to 20 minutes.

If you believe someone has been poisoned, call the Poison Help line (1-800-222-1222) immediately. If the person is not breathing, call 911.

poisonHere are some things to know when calling the Poison Help line:

  • The person’s age and weight
  • Known health conditions or problems
  • The product involved
  • When and how the product contacted the person
  • What first aid has already been given
  • Whether the person has vomited
  • Your exact location and how long it would take to get to a hospital

While these tips are helpful, they are not all inclusive. Please visit the Poison Help website, the National Poison Prevention Week website and the Maryland Poison Center for more information.

Making Heart Health a Year-Round Priority

By: Hope Gamper, Editorial Intern

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February and American Heart Month are ending, but just because March is around the corner doesn’t mean you should stop thinking about keeping your heart in tip-top shape.

The American Heart Association (AHA), whose mission is to fight cardiovascular diseases and stroke, and the UM Heart Center offer a series of lifestyle recommendations for optimizing your heart health all year round.

Move More

Working out regularly is one of the best things you can do for your heart. Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity at least 5 times a week (if you can’t do 30 minutes at a time, you can add up 10-minute sessions throughout the day).

Also try working in exercise to your normal routine:

  • Instead of driving to the store, walk or bike.
  • Park in a spot farther from your destination.
  • Keep dumbbells near the remote so you can stay active while watching TV.

Skip the Snacks

What you eat is just as important as what you do. Swapping out foods heavy with added sodium and fat for nutrient-rich foods can help you manage your weight, cholesterol and blood pressure. Here is a list of foods to fix and foods to nix.

Fix more foods high in vitamins, minerals and fiber, including:

  • Fruits and veggies
  • Whole grains – brown rice, quinoa, barley and buckwheat
  • Low-fat dairy products
  • Protein sources – poultry, fish and nuts

Nix processed foods and those that tend to be high in sodium and fat, including:

  • Sugary foods and beverages
  • Red meat
  • Deep fried foods or foods cooked in butter

Avoid Tobacco

Tobacco and other ingredients common in cigarettes frequently contribute to heart disease. Even secondhand smoke kills nearly 70,000 people each year.

The good news is that when you quit smoking you see short term benefits right away, and it only takes about 5 to 15 years to reduce stroke risk to that similar of a nonsmoker. There is still time to reverse the damage caused by tobacco and ensure that your heart keeps pumping for many years to come.

Click here for a list of Smoking Cessation Classes in your area.

 

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Heart disease accounts for 1 in 4 deaths each year, making these types of incremental changes vital to reducing your risk of heart related illness and keeping your heart well for all of life’s challenges, in February or any other month.

UMMS “Spring Into a Healthy Summer” Event Serves Up a Dose of Wellness

By Kate Hancock , Public Affairs Intern, and Sharon Boston, Media Relations Manager, University of Maryland Medical System

Good staff pic newAs part of our commitment to giving back to our communities, the University of Maryland Medical System’s Community Benefits and Outreach Committee sprang into action with the “Spring Into a Healthy Summer” event June 14 in University Plaza Park, right across from the Medical Center.

Our dedicated health care providers started off the summer by providing hundreds of people with essential health information, free screenings and fun fitness activities.

Nearly 100 guests took advantage of free blood pressure and cholesterol checks, and many people expressed their excitement by playing with fitness equipment and sampling healthy foods at the Healthy Groove van.

Healthy Groove smaller

While some visitors were content to merely read about health and fitness, a few enthusiastic guests showed their newfound commitment to health with an invigorating line dance right in the middle of the park!

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Magic 95.9 broadcast live from the event and radio personality Tim Watts interviewed UMMS health professionals on topics ranging from breast cancer to smoking cessation and childhood obesity

Thanks to this event, the UMMS team shared health and wellness information with hundreds of Marylanders who have a healthier start for summer 2013.