Double Listing: A Promising Option for Certain Patients

We recently participated in Mediaplanet USA’s “Hepatitis & Liver” campaign where industry professionals and associations came together to draw attention to the importance of liver health, while highlighting hepatitis awareness, testing education, and treatment to erase the stigma and judgments attached to the disease.

Dr. Rolf Barth, director of Liver Transplantation, was featured in an article about the types of patients who typically see results from double listing. He mentions patients with less threatening illnesses, who do not require immediate transplantation, can stand to gain more from a double listing, whereas the sickest patients are already at the top of the list, and do not necessarily benefit.

The campaign was distributed within the centerfold of USA Today and is published on a Mediaplanet original site. You can read the full article here: http://umm.gd/1NON6hs

Thanking Donors with All of Our Heart

By: Hope Gamper, Editorial Intern

Most people know February 14th as Valentine’s Day,  but February 14th also shares the honor of being National Donor Day. National Donor Day honors donors of organs, tissues, marrow, platelets and blood. This Valentine’s Day, consider giving the gift of life to someone in need and celebrate the amazing generosity of former donors.

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A Great Need for Organ Donors

Every 10 minutes, someone is added to the waiting list for an organ. While UMMC offers multiple listing, potentially allowing a patient to receive an organ sooner, the need for donors is still great.

As the demand for organs rises, so does the need for organ donors. There are two types of organ donors: deceased donors and living donors, and both play an important role in healing someone in need.

A donation from a deceased individual can save as many as 8 lives and the process is facilitated by the Living Legacy Foundation. Deceased donors can provide tissues, corneas and organs such as the kidneys, pancreas, liver, lungs, heart and intestines. Donations are only considered after all life-saving efforts have been exhausted. To prepare for this type of donation, update your driver’s license donor status through the MVA.

The living organ donation process allows living individuals the ability to donate whole kidneys or parts of the liver, pancreas, lungs and intestines. Most of these organs either regenerate on their own or can function without a small portion. Receiving a transplant from a living donor is often an alternative to waiting on the national transplant waiting list. Learn more about living donation for a loved one.

Where Donations Go

Transplant surgeons at UMMC perform a total of more than 420 transplants, but there are currently more than 123,000 people in need of lifesaving transplants. You may direct a donation to a specific individual or your donation may go to the next eligible person on the waiting list. Patients who receive your donation will be matched based on an array of factors including blood type and severity of illness.

To those in need, donating an organ is an indescribable gift.  Successful UMMC transplant recipients for heart, kidney, lungliver and other conditions, have gone on to live joyfully once again.

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To the Heart of the Matter – Ways You Can Help

  • Consider giving the gift of life this Donor Day. Learn more about providing a living donation for a loved one from the UMMC Transplant Center.
  • Become an organ donor by opting in the next time you renew your driver’s license or filling out the online registry form here: https://register.donatelifemaryland.org/
  • Sign up with the Red Cross for a UMMC blood drive to donate blood or platelets.

And most importantly, thank an organ donor and their heroic and truly altruistic gift that has given thousands of people a second chance at life.

A Gift of Life and Friendship After a Family’s Loss

The weekly StoryCorps segment on National Public Radio’s Morning Edition is a highlight for the show’s listeners. Today’s StoryCorps interview was very special to staff at UMMC.

Rick Bounds received a lifesaving liver and kidney transplant here in 2007. Today, he’s a healthy triathlete with four competitions and a 100-mile bike ride to his name. And he serves as a member of the Medical Center’s Patient and Family Partnership Council.

Go to the NPR site to hear or read the conversation between Rick Bounds and Dorothy Biernack, whose husband, Marty, was the organ donor who made it possible for Rick to live. Rick and Dorothy get together several times a year to celebrate Marty’s lifesaving final gift.

Young Accountant Reaches Professional Milestone One Year After Living Donor Liver Transplant

By Jennifer Dietrick

Baltimore, MD

FEBRUARY 18, 2013 — As of today, I am officially one year post-op! One year ago, Dr. Barth and Dr. LaMattina had finished the living donor liver transplantation that saved my life!  When the doctors returned to the waiting room to update my family, the entire room erupted in applause! My boyfriend, Rob, was the donor.  Here’s what I’ve been up to in the past year:

I’ve been very busy with work. Being an accountant, this is our busiest time of the year so I am trying really hard to keep up. My biggest goal is to become a CPA (Certified Public Accountant). The test is VERY difficult. It is split into 4 grueling sections which require about 2 months of intensive studying each, while working a full-time schedule.

Before I went into acute liver failure, I had passed 2 parts of the exam (halfway!) but unfortunately, all 4 parts of the exam must be passed within an 18-month time frame. I lost the 2 parts that I had passed during the past year while I was focusing on my recovery. It was very disappointing. In December of 2012, I finally started getting some energy back after struggling with persistent anemia and a hematocrit between 28-30 (36 is normal). I studied really hard during the holidays and took 1 part on January 4 and I just found out that I PASSED!! Now I am on my way again to achieving my goal — and I am only 1 year post-op.

It’s such a wonderful feeling! During the past year, my recovery was really difficult and it seemed like I would never get better and now, 1 year out, I am down to 2 pills, twice a day and living a completely normal life!

I wanted to share this with other patients in hopes that it may provide some hope for anyone recovering or for those who have loved ones recovering from transplants or any other major surgery. There IS a light at the end of the tunnel and it is frustrating getting there but if you keep on working at it, you WILL go on to live the life you imagined and more!

You don’t have to be defined by the fact that you are a transplant recipient or let it hold you back from accomplishing your goals and dreams! Yes, I received a liver transplant but hopefully in the future I will be defined as Jennifer Dietrick, CPA!!