Spreading Thanksgiving Cheer with a Thanksgiving Meal Spread

Between prepping, cooking, cleaning and entertaining, Thanksgiving sometimes turns into a high-stress holiday rather than a time for giving thanks. This time of year is already stressful for families at University of Maryland Children’s Hospital (UMCH), who spend the holidays at the hospital instead of at home.

Members from the Chesapeake Bay Beach Club in Stevensville, Md. donated a Thanksgiving meal to all UMCH patients, families and staff members, to take one thing off of their plates for the holidays.

Amanda Ackermann, a first year Child Life graduate student at Towson University and a Child Life Scholar at UMCH, coordinated the donation. As part of her Child Life Scholar field study, she spends 20 hours a week providing and supervising developmentally appropriate activities for patients. She also organizes special events, implements new programming and manages donations.

Amanda (third from right) and the Chesapeake Bay Beach Club team

Amanda is also a banquet server at the Chesapeake Bay Beach Club, and she thought it was only natural to bring her two jobs together.

“I brought up the idea of giving back to the UMCH families, and the general manager, Dereck, was instantly on board to help,” Amanda said.

The initial idea, to donate homemade pies, grew into a full Thanksgiving meal. After putting in months of planning for the meal, the team decided they wanted to do even more! The entire management staff donated toys for all ages, which were distributed to children with their meals.

Many thanks to Chesapeake Bay Beach Club for making this Thanksgiving extra special!!

 

Giving Back to The Hospital That Gave A Family So Much

Guest Blog By: Deb Montgomery, University of Maryland Children’s Hospital Parent

My daughter, Neriah, has had many varied health issues over the course of her childhood, including severe asthma, allergies, gastrointenstinal issues, and more. We have been blessed to have her under the care of several of the doctors in the Pediatric Specialty Clinic at the University of Maryland Childnre’s Hospital (UMCH). During the past several years, we’ve been through a multitude of appointments, testing, and hospitalizations.

As you can imagine, this has been really hard, and especially heartbreaking to see all that our little girl had to endure. Good care from doctors and nurses helped, but it was hard to keep positive and distract our sweet girl from all of the pain and discomfort. In some of the toughest medical tests and hospitalizations, we were introduced to the Child Life program.

Through that, she was given some toys and crafts to keep her busy, and distract her a bit from what was going on. It was such a help to have someone else “on our side”, trying to make the whole hospital ordeal a more positive experience for our little girl! When she got home from different times in the hospital, she would show her sisters some crafts that she made, or little presents she got to keep. She never told stories about the hard stuff, but she focused on those fun, positive memories! We really appreciate the positive memories that she has of the hospital, through the Child Life program.

It’s because of that, that we would like to help more children in the hospital to go home with some positive memories! We know how much it means to get some help at some of the hardest times. Our little girl loves to read, and we are having a book drive to raise money to buy Usborne books and more for the Child Life program to give to kids at UMCH. Usborne books are really engaging and interactive, and would really help to bring some joy to a child in the hospital. Usborne will match your donation at 50%, so we’ll be able to get even more books to the children! Click through the link below to donate to the fundraiser, to take part in giving some wonderful books to children in the hospital at UMCH!
Click here to support Provide books to children in the hospital at UMCH

What Parents Need to Know About Dry Drowning

Dr. Christian Wright is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and specializes in pediatric emergency medicine at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital. Below he answers everything parents need to know about “dry drowning.”

What is dry drowning?

“Dry drowning” is actually an outdated term. These days, research and health organizations prefer to simply define drowning as a process where being submerged or immersed in liquid leads to respiratory impairment—that is, difficulty breathing. Drowning can be fatal or nonfatal. Sometimes a person can develop difficulty breathing after they have left the water, sometimes even hours later, and sadly there have been cases when children have died of drowning hours after being exposed to water.

In the media, a distinction is often made between “dry drowning” and “secondary drowning.” Again, these are outdated terms, but they do attempt to explain two physiological processes that occur in drowning.

When water is inhaled, it causes a spasm of the airways which causes them to close, which makes it difficult to breathe. This usually happens right after the water has been inhaled, so the person could still be in the water or they could have just left it. In the past, it was thought that in this way a person could drown without water entering the lungs, so this was called “dry drowning.” In reality, though, water enters the lungs in almost every drowning death.

When water gets into the lungs, it interferes with our lungs’ ability to exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide, so oxygen levels in the body drop. Water also washes out surfactant, which is a substance in our lungs that prevents the small air sacs (alveoli) from collapsing when we exhale. This leads to pulmonary edema, or a buildup of fluid in the lungs, and difficulty breathing. A child could develop these symptoms up to 24 hours after exposure to water, and in rare cases this results in death. This has been referred to as “secondary drowning,” though it is really just the culmination of the drowning that started when the child was in the water.

How common is it?

“Secondary drowning” is rare, so there aren’t good statistics about how frequently it happens.

What are the symptoms?

Any time water enters our airway, our body has reflexes that kick in to clear the water. So a child could have coughing, gagging or difficulty breathing. Usually, this is sufficient to clear the airway. However, if water got into the lungs, the child could develop symptoms hours later. These include coughing, difficulty breathing, chest pain, vomiting, irritability or fatigue.

How does someone become a victim of dry drowning?

Any time water is inhaled, it could cause delayed symptoms. This could be after swimming or bathing or even after a short exposure to water like being dunked or the face being submerged in a puddle.

How’s it treated?

Drownings are treated by monitoring lung function and treating as necessary. A patient without symptoms may only need to be monitored. Patients with symptoms will need to have their lung functions monitored and supported. They might need supplemental oxygen, noninvasive forms of ventilation like CPAP, or a breathing tube may need to be placed. These patients will need to be monitored until their symptoms go away and their lungs are working normally again.

What’s the best way to prevent dry drowning?

The best way to prevent “dry drowning” is to exercise good water safety principles, including the following:

  • All children should be closely watched whenever they are are in or near water. Never leave children unattended near water.
  • Swim where there is a lifeguard, but don’t rely on the lifeguard alone to watch your child—continue to closely monitor your child.
  • Make sure pools are properly fenced and guarded. Fences should completely surround the pool area, be at least 4 feet tall, and gates should be self-closing and self-latching.
  • Teach teenagers the dangers of drinking alcohol while engaging in water activities.
  • Teach children to not roughhouse in the water
  • Enroll children in swimming lessons as early as possible
  • Have young or inexperienced swimmers wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets
  • Learn CPR

To learn more about Pediatric Emergency Medicine at the Universtiy of Maryland Children’s Hospital, please click here.

3 Things to Know about Mother-Child Relationships

By Sarah Edwards, DO

  1. Healthy moms = healthy children and families. Healthy moms are essential to building children’s healthy brains and helping everyone in the family grow well and love well. Maternal depression, anxiety and stress can affect how a mother interacts and develops a relationship with her baby. Babies need a safe and stable connection with a caregiver for social, emotional and cognitive development. If this attachment is not strong, it can have lasting effects on a child’s brain, and puts children at risk for behavior and emotional problems.
  2. Family bonding is key to a healthy family. The good news is that there are effective ways to help caregivers bond with their children and promote a healthy relationship for the whole family. Finding joy in themselves and each other helps everyone feel loved and part of something important: their family.
  3. Help is available. If you have concerns about your relationship with your young child, contact the University of Maryland Medical Center’s Secure Starts Clinic at 410-328-3522 to make an appointment.

Dr. Edwards is the medical director of child and adolescent psychiatry services at University of Maryland Medical Center and an assistant professor of psychiatry with the University of Maryland School of Medicine. For a consultation, call 410-328-3522.

The Love Blanket Project Spreads Love Around UMCH

Love comes in many shapes and sizes, but for Robin Chiddo it’s square, 44×44 and fuzzy.

Today, Robin from the Love Blanket Project dropped off 33 custom t-shirt blankets that will be given out to children staying at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital.

The Love Blanket Project started in 2015 when Robin, who recently retired from her position as director of business development at the UMD Alumni Association at College Park, was looking for a heartfelt gift for her sister. In her research, Robin also wanted to find a company that had a clear, mission-driven purpose—then she came across Deaf Initiatives’ Keepsake Theme Quilts (KTQ).

Deaf Initiatives is an organization that employs deaf individuals and teaches employees how to run a small business in a deaf-friendly environment. Robin and her sister loved the first quilt they received, and she started the Love Blanket Project soon after.

Robin sends donated t-shirts to KTQ, and in 4-8 weeks, she receives beautifully crafted blankets. Each blanket is gift wrapped by Robin and the Love Blanket Project team, topped with a “have a comfy day” card and donated to hospitals across the state. The Love Blanket Project has donated to University of Maryland Children’s Hospital since the organization’s beginnings.

Myracle and her mom with a new Love Blanket

Robin has no trouble finding enough shirts—between the UMD bookstore, athletics department and generous donations from Corrigan Sports and Tough Mudder, the Love Blanket Project is swimming in shirts!

So, how can you help?

Robin is always looking for volunteers to help with fundraising. Each blanket costs $110 to produce, and all money to produce the blankets comes from fundraising and donations. If you want to get in touch with the Love Blanket Project, call 202-528-2208 or email loveblanketproject@gmail.com.

Shannon Joslin (left, Child Life Manager) and Robin Chiddo with one of past years’ blankets.

Child Life Month

How Play is Helping UMMC’s Youngest Patients

By: Colleen Schmidt, System Communications Intern

As many parents know, the hospital can be a scary and unfamiliar place for a child. To help relax these fears, UMMC’s team of child life specialists and assistants use a variety of techniques to help children adjust to the hospital setting. Child life specialists, or CLS, aim to provide a positive and non-traumatic hospital experience for all patients at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital.  UMMC’s Child Life team consists of six CLS and two assistants. They work in the Pediatric Progressive Care Unit (PPCU), Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) and the Pediatric ER.

Members of the Child Life Team

 

Play is one technique often used by child life team to help normalize the child’s hospital experience.  Various types of play are thoughtfully used to help children meet developmental milestones, express emotions, and understand their medical situation.  For example, during a practice called medical play, a CLS will provide their patient with a “hospital buddy” or small doll that the child can decorate. Next, with the guidance of a CLS, the child is introduced to medical equipment that they can explore and use on their new hospital buddy.  According to Aubrey Donley, a CLS at the pediatric ER, medical play is helpful in addressing misconceptions the child has about medical equipment.

“It gives them a sense of control and mastery over their hospital experience and over what they’ve been through,” she explains. Medical play empowers patients and allows them to have an active role in their hospitalization. Helping the children understand their environment lessens the chances of confusing or traumatizing them.

In addition to medical play, the child life team uses therapeutic play to help children work through a variety of issues that may accompany hospitalization. Sometimes, children who are hospitalized have experienced severe trauma. Unlike adults, children may not be able to verbalize their feelings. Play is how they express themselves and work through their experiences. For instance, one of Donley’s young patients survived a house fire and used play to understand what happened to him. “He was running around in a fireman costume pretending to put out a fire. For an onlooker, it might seem like he was just playing but we understand he is trying to make sense of the chaos and trauma that he had witnessed,” she explained. Therapeutic play can also help children who are at the hospital for long periods of time meet their physical and cognitive milestones.

With backgrounds in child development, the child life team is able to make individual plans for each child that matches their medical, physical, and emotional needs.  The team advocates for the children they support, and work with an interdisciplinary team of medical professionals to provide a comprehensive plan for that child. Child life specialists also provide educational and emotional support for families. All services provided by the child life team come at no charge to families.


For more information on our child life services please visit: http://umm.edu/programs/childrens/services/inpatient/child-life

Winter Wives’ Tale

The University of Maryland Children’s Hospital sets the record straight…

Put on your hat since you lose most of your body heat through your head.”
This is not necessarily true! Your body heat escapes from any exposed area- so if you had on snow pants and a T-shirt and you forget your hat and jacket, the most amount of heat would escape through your arms- since that would be the largest exposed part of your body. Putting on winter accessories such as hats, mittens and scarves is still a very good idea to avoid the outside dangers of frostbite and hypothermia.

You will get sick if you go outside with wet hair.”
This is another winter wives’ tale. While your kids may be cold, they won’t actually catch a cold by venturing outdoors with a wet head. Germs are spread by people, and temperature simply doesn’t play a part.

 

Occupational Therapist Brings Holiday Cheer to NICU with Photo Shoot

img_9300-3Just before the holiday season, Lisa Glass, an occupational therapist in The Drs. Rouben and Violet Jiji Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) set up a Christmas photo shoot to show off the festive side of some of our tiniest patients.

Glass, who enjoys photography in her spare time, developed the idea for the photo-shoot as a “cute way to give some nice holiday photos to parents”. Since NICU babies are often among the sickest children in the hospital, and need round the clock medical care, it can be difficult for parents to appreciate the traditional joys of having a newborn. Especially during the first few critical months of life, this can include newborn pictures. Glass and her coworkers wanted to be able to “highlight how beautiful [these] babies are,” and give parents a view of their child in a more upbeat and positive light.

img_9142-3After work hours, Glass and two physical therapy coworkers in the University of Maryland Department of Rehabilitation Services, Laura Evans and Carly Funk, went from room to room, and for four and a half hours, photographed over 30 babies. Following the photography session, Glass edited her pictures, emailed them to parents, and even printed a few copies to surprise parents in their babies’ rooms. Following the photo shoot, she received many happy emails thanking her for what she had done. But for Glass, going above and beyond to show compassion and joy was an easy feat.

“For me, it was a pleasure to interact with the babies and the parents”, said Glass. “Parents are used to seeing their children as sick patients, not as beautiful babies. It’s important to see your patients not just as patients, but as people, too.”

Glass also emphasized the importance of teamwork in this endeavor.

“I wouldn’t have been able to do this without [Laura and Carly’s] help the whole way through.” This NICU trio showcases the importance of working together to bring some extra joy to UMMC.

Glass’ photography serves as a great reminder to see patients as the people they are, and not simply for the medical treatment they are receiving. Although these babies may have breathing tubes and cords surrounding them, they are also enveloped in a multitude of love and support.

trilpets-single-photos



Working Hard to Engage West Baltimore Communities

Members from UMMC’s Community and Workforce Development and Commitment to Excellence teams visited Mr. Barnett’s 5th grade class at James McHenry Elementary/Middle School.

The team dropped off 32 book bags (one for each student) filled with books and school supplies. Students also received holiday toys, donated by UMMC employees and staff. Additionally, through UMMC Commitment to Excellence holiday “Give Back Campaign”, UMMC employees and staff donated socks, undershirts, underwear, and other under garments to James McHenry Elementary/Middle School’s Uniform Closet.

UMMC has officially “adopted” this class, and will be closely working with them to provide mentoring, professional development and engagement opportunities. The UMMC community will continue to work with these students through middle school, high school, college and beyond!

This is just one example of how UMMC is continually working to improve the lives of those in its surrounding communities. UMMC aims to identify and address critical issues in West Baltimore by building permanent relationships with individuals and organizations in the area.

Some other UMMC initiatives include:

  • Launching the Stanford Living Well/Chronic Disease Management Program.
  • Implementing the BHEC Baltimore City-wide Community Health Work Training Certificate Program.
  • Sponsoring 50 youth in the 2017 Youth Works Internship program.
  • Initiating meetings with West Baltimore community organizations to introduce new CEO and re-establish collaborative relationships.

 

Learn more about UMMC’s community engagement efforts on our website: http://umm.edu/community

 

“No Screens Under 2” Q&A with Dr. Brenda Hussey-Gardner

brenda-hussey-gardnerHi, my name is Dr. Brenda Hussey-Gardner. I am a developmental specialist who works with the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital. I attended the American Academy of Pediatrics conference in San Francisco to share the results of research that I have done with colleagues here at the University of Maryland and to learn what other researchers are doing across the nation in order to bring this new knowledge back to the hospital to better serve our children and their families. At this conference, the American Academy of Pediatrics released their new guidelines regarding screen time and children.

Please see the Q&A here for more information on these guidelines.

Q: What is the “No Screens Under 2” rule and in what ways is it changing?

A: The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) previously recommended no screen time for children under 2 years of age. In its new guidelines, the AAP offers slightly different recommendations for children less than 18 months and those 18 to 24 months of age.

Children less than 18 months

The AAP discourages parents from using digital media with one exception: video-chatting (e.g., Skype, FaceTime). This form of interactive media can be used, with parent support, to foster social relationships with distant relatives.

Children 18 to 24 months

The AAP recommends that parents, who want to introduce their child to digital media, do the following:

  1. Only use high-quality educational content.
  2. Always watch shows or use apps with your child. Talking about what the child sees helps foster learning.
  3. Never allow your child to use media alone.
  4.  Limit media to a maximum of 1 hour per day.
  5. Avoid all screen time during meals, parent-child playtime and an hour before bedtime.

Q: Can you provide some insight into how the decision was made? What research was taken into account?

A: The AAP Council on Communications and Media reviewed research on child development, television, videos and mobile/interactive technologies to develop their current recommendations. Research shows that children under the age of 2 years need two things to develop their thinking, language, motor and social-emotional skills: (1) they need to interact with their parents and other loving caregivers, and (2) they need hands-on experiences with the real world. In fact, researchers have demonstrated that infants and toddlers don’t yet have the symbolic, memory and attention skills needed to learn from digital media. Importantly, research also shows evidence of harm (e.g., delayed thinking, language and social-emotional development; poorer executive functioning) from excessive media use with young children.

Q: Why do these new guidelines matter to parents, and should they affect the ways parents and their young children interact with technology?

A: AAP guidelines matter because parents want their children to be well adjusted and smart, and they don’t want to do anything that may harm their child’s development. As such, parents should try their best to avoid screens with their children who are less than 18 months of age and realize that it is their interactions with their child that are the most important. Then, from 18 to 24 months of age, parents should strive to use only the highest quality educational technology with their child. As hard as it is, parents should try to avoid using technology as a babysitter and try to understand the negative impact that it can have on their child’s development.

Q: What is your biggest take-away from the session?

A: A parent’s lap is always better than any app!

Q: What is your opinion on the new guidelines and do you think it will affect your clinical practice? If so, how?

A: I believe that the new AAP guidelines, while a little more flexible, may still be difficult for parents to adhere to, as screen time is so pervasive in our society. However, it is very important for parents to make smart choices about digital media and screen time if they want to help their infant and toddler develop into a child who is healthy and ready for success in preschool. It is my goal to develop a pamphlet summarizing the research findings and AAP guidelines to help parents make the best choices for their child and family.

 

For more information about media, screen time, and child development, parents are encouraged to read the AAP recommendations located within the publication “Media and Young Minds,” and to read the “Early Learning and Educational Technology Brief” published by the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.