Signs of Bullying

This information is provided by University of Maryland Children’s Hospital, the Center for Infant and Child Loss and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

As a parent, there are many things you need to diligently watch for in your child. One of them is to look for signs of bullying.

There are health risks related to depression for the victim, bully, and those who witness bullying, which may include:

  • Irritability or angerdoctor-consoling-patient-126648704
  • Nightmares
  • Headaches
  • Stomachaches
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Multiple joint and muscle pains
  • Weight gain or loss
  • Depression
  • Difficulties in falling and/or staying asleep
  • Self-injury (i.e., cutting)
  • Impulsivity
  • Suicide attempts
  • Homicidal thoughts

If your child is experiencing any of the above, talk with them, and contact their pediatrician or teacher. For more information call 800-808-7437.

 

 

8 Tips to Confront Bullying in School

This information is provided by University of Maryland Children’s Hospital, the Center for Infant and Child Loss and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

bullyingBullying is a behavior that is both repeated and intended to hurt someone either physically, emotionally, or both. It can take many forms like teasing, name calling, making threats, physical assaults, and cyber-bullying.

If your child is being bullied and is attending one of Maryland’s public schools, you and your child have the right to report your concerns. The school also has the responsibility to investigate those concerns. Here are eight tips to stop bullying and report the problem:

  • Ask your child’s teacher, counselor, or administrator if you can speak privately about a personal problem. Talk about what is happening or making you (or your child) uncomfortable, and how long it’s been going on.
  • Ask for a Bullying, Harassment or Intimidation Reporting Form; or download at GracesLawMaryland.com. Complete the form, return one copy to the administrator, and keep a copy for yourself.
  • Feel free to call the Maryland State Department of Education if you have additional questions regarding the completion of the Bullying Form. You can reach them at 410-767-0031.
  • If an incident occurs in an unstructured area, ask what the school will do to make you (or your child) feel safe.
  • Ask the administrator to investigate allegations, develop a plan of support and schedule a meeting.
  • If your child is being bullied on a social media site, take a screen shot and save the content to share with parents, police, and the school administration. Fill out a report as often as you need to.
  • Change your password, use privacy settings, and block people on social media who send negative messages, texts, tweets or photos.
  • Ask friends not to share negative social media or pass along to others.

For more information call 800-808-7437.

Pediatric Residents at Univeristy of Maryland Reach Out and Read

A string of rainy days in Baltimore made Friday the perfect day to stay inside and read a good book. And thanks to the efforts of some hard-working Pediatric Residents at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, more than 200 students in Baltimore City had a new story to read!

Throughout the morning, the pediatricians-to-be visited several schools in the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital community, including James McHenry Elementary-Middle School and Franklin Square Elementary in West Baltimore. They spent time interacting with the students, with the hopes of promoting a healthy attitude toward development and literacy at a young age.

James McHenry students had a special visitor: Baltimore City Council President Jack Young handed out books and spent time reading to four classrooms of Pre-K and Kindergarten students.

The Maryland Book Bank and the Maryland Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics donated the 200 books that went home with students.

The day of reading was a part of a nationwide “ROAR: Reach Out and Read” effort, which is a non-profit that works to incorporate books and literacy into pediatric care.

Friday was also designated as a “Call to Action” Day by the American Academy of Pediatrics to F.A.C.E Poverty: promote Food Security, Access to Health Care, Community, and Education.

Brushing Twice a Day Keeps Decay Away – National Children’s Dental Health Month

By Zuryna Smith, System Communications Intern

Little boy teethNational Children’s Dental Health Month was introduced by the American Dental Association as a way to provide crucial information regarding oral health in children.

It started as a one-day event in Cleveland. As the importance of the issue of oral health became more prevalent, the one-day event spanned across a week and eventually became a month-long event that garnered global attention.

The ADA provides health fairs, free dental screenings, and other activities that promote the adoption of healthy oral health techniques.  This year’s campaign slogan is entitled “Sugar Wars,” a spin on the sci-fiction film Star Wars.

Tooth decay and loss is one of the main oral health issues that affect children. Preventative care is the only way to deter the loss of teeth. The rule of thumb is to brush two times a day for two minutes each time. In addition to proper brushing techniques, parents should be vigilant in their efforts to keep their children’s teeth shiny and healthy.

Here are a few tips that will encourage healthy dental habits:

  • Emphasize the importance of fluoride. Fluoride is a natural chemical that prevents decay and strengthens the enamel of teeth. It can be found in tap water and is also available as a supplement.
  • A healthy and balanced diet is a necessity in order to prevent tooth decay. While starches and fruits are essential to a child’s diet, certain foods need to be given in moderation. Starchy and sticky foods tend to stay on the child’s teeth and cause cavities as well as decay.
  • Daily cleaning should take place as soon as the child develops their first tooth. A small piece of gauze or a damp cloth can be used to clean the tooth. As the child gets older a toothbrush with a small amount of fluoride toothpaste should be used.

Dental sealants are another method of prevention for young children. Dental sealants are small, plastic coatings that cover the chewing surfaces of the back teeth. It helps to prevent excess food and germs from getting caught in the crevices of the teeth.

Childrens teeth

University of Maryland School of Dentistry students participated in an outreach program where they provided free sealant treatments to children in need at the Perryville Clinic. The overall purpose of the event was to provide assistance and education to those who would not normally have access to proper dental care providers.

For more information about an upcoming Sealant Saturday event please contact the Perryville Clinic at 410-706-4900.

Pediatric Dental Appointments are available at the University of Maryland Pediatric Dental Clinic by calling 410-706-4213. You can also search for a Dental Health provider by using our website.

Governor Larry Hogan Visits the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

“Heading to my fifth round of five-day, 24-hour chemo this morning at the University of Maryland Medical System in Baltimore. As always thank you to everyone for your prayers and support during this journey!

Before my treatment I took some time to visit the brand-new, world-class Drs. Rouben and Violet Jiji Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at UMMS which officially opened on Tuesday. There I met families with children being treated at the NICU and listened to the stories of Baby Rebecca, Baby Ilyanna, and Baby Javion who are on the road to recovery following bouts with a range of health challenges such as infections, cardiac abnormalities, and abdominal complications. They are carefully cared for, with a balance of compassion and unparalleled clinical excellence!

The work these incredible doctors and nurses at the NICU do is amazing and they are saving lives every day! Please keep these families in your thoughts and prayers!”

-Governor Larry Hogan

Gov. Hogan NICU 1Gov. Hogan NICU 2Gov. Hogan NICU 3Gov. Hogan NICU 5Gov. Hogan NICU 6

 

Public Health Leaders Urge Vaccination Against Measles

Physician-in-Chief, University of Maryland Children’s Hospital

It is impossible today to turn on the TV or read the news without hearing about the current debate surrounding childhood vaccinations and the measles outbreaks in the United States.

As chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, I took the opportunity to encourage parents to get their children vaccinated by participating in a joint statement with other pediatric and public health leaders from around Baltimore. Please consider the public health benefits of vaccinating your children, and talk to your pediatrician to get the answers you need to feel comfortable with this lifesaving decision.

Mandatory Pulse Oximetry Screening for Newborns Takes Effect in Maryland

By Carissa M. Baker-Smith, MD, MPH

Assistant Professor, University of Maryland School of Medicine

Pediatric Cardiologist, University of Maryland Children’s Heart Program

A quick, painless and non-invasive test to determine the amount of oxygen in a newborn baby’s blood is a first step in screening infants for congenital heart defects. Beginning September 1, 2012, hospitals in Maryland must administer the test to all newborns.

Congenital heart disease (CHD) occurs in approximately 8 of every 1,000 children.  Infants born with congenital heart disease have structural defects of the heart. Approximately 25% of all CHD cases are critical and require intervention during the infant’s first month of life. Interventions can include the administration of special medications or even surgery. Pulse oximetry may be helpful in improving the detection of critical CHD (CCHD).

On September 1, 2012, hospitals across Maryland begin mandatory pulse oximetry screening for all newborns. The screening must be done by a health professional before the infant is discharged and within 24 to 48 hours after birth. All hospitals in Maryland will be responsible for creating and implementing pulse oximetry screening protocols.

Children who “fail” pulse oximetry screening will undergo further evaluation, and their primary care providers will work closely with pediatric cardiologists to make the correct diagnosis. Failing the pulse oximetry test means oxygen saturation is lower than normal without another explanation, such as infection or lung disease.

What is pulse oximetry?

Pulse oximetry relies on the use of a non-invasive, painless method for detecting the amount of oxygen in the blood.  Probes are applied to the palm of the hand and the sole of the foot. The protocol selected by the State of Maryland for screening  is published in the Journal of Pediatrics (Pediatrics 2011; 128; e1259). Children with oxygen saturation less than 90% automatically test positive and fail screening.  Children with oxygen saturation greater than 95% test negative and pass screening. Children with oxygen saturation between 90% and 95% will undergo repeat testing and evaluation.

What is the potential impact of pulse oximetry screening?

We anticipate that pulse oximetry screening will enhance detection of CCHD. Data indicate that for every 1,000 children born in Maryland, 2.3 have CCHD.  Currently, between 60% and 70% of these infants are diagnosed through prenatal screening, leaving approximately 30% who are not yet diagnosed by the time they are born. Combined with physical examination, pulse oximetry is reported to improve sensitivity for detecting CHD by 20%.

What is the role of the Children’s Heart Program?

The University of Maryland Children’s Heart Program offers a comprehensive panel of services designed to accurately diagnose and effectively manage and treat children with CHD and CCHD.  Pediatric cardiologists are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to assist with the diagnosis of CHD.  Through consultation and telemedicine services, the Children’s Heart Program is ready to assist surrounding providers and families with the evaluation of infants with suspected CCHD.

For more information on pulse oximetry, please contact the Children’s Heart Program at 410-328-4FIT (4348).

Dr. Baker-Smith is a member of the Maryland State Advisory Council’s Committee for CCHD and the Newborn Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease multi-institutional group.

A Mission to Ecuador for Pediatric Heart Surgeon

By Meghan Scalea

UMMC Communications Account Leader

Sunjay Kaushal, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor at UM School of Medicine and director of pediatric cardiac surgery at UMMC, recently returned from a medical mission to Ecuador, where he performed life-saving heart surgeries on nearly 20 children who would have died without surgery.

 

Dr. Kaushal, a father of two, is a huge advocate for kids. This medical mission to Guayaquil, Ecuador, was his fifth trip with the International Children’s Heart Foundation (ICHF), a group dedicated to providing supplies, training and surgical resources to care for underprivileged children with heart disease in dozens of countries around the world.

According to the ICHF, 1% of the world’s population is born with heart disease, only about one-third is diagnosed, and even fewer receive life-saving heart surgery. Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect in the world.

“There is a huge surplus of kids with congenital heart disease,” says Kaushal. “Traveling with this group allows me to provide free health care for children who wouldn’t otherwise be treated.”

Joining him in Ecuadorwas UMMC certified surgical technologist, Nicolette Dupuis, who supports Dr. Kaushal in his pediatric heart surgeries in the OR in Baltimore. This marked Dr. Kaushal and Ms. Dupuis’s third medical mission trip together. During their week inEcuador, they worked with cardiologists and intensivists from hospitals around theU.S. in the sparse operating rooms.

 “Part of our job while we were inEcuadorwas to teach the local medical professionals to do congenital heart surgeries like we do, but on a smaller level,” says Dr. Kaushal. “Our day began at 7:30 am, and we’d operate until 9:00 pm. We staffed the ICU 24/7 during the time we were there to make sure those children had the post-operative care they needed.”

Dr. Kaushal is the only board-certified congenital heart surgeon inMaryland, giving him a unique expertise in performing surgical procedures on babies just a few days old who were born with heart disease, children with congenital and acquired heart disease, and adults living with heart conditions they developed as babies, known as adult congenital heart disease.

Dr. Kaushal performs the most complex pediatric heart surgeries available today, including surgeries for babies with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, Tetralogy of Fallot and ventricular septal defect, and those in need of pulmonary valve replacement. He is also preparing to open a clinical trial that will use a baby’s own stem cells to regenerate the underdeveloped portion of their heart caused by hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

We invite you to learn more about what Dr. Kaushal and the Children’s Heart Program at UMMC are doing for children within the Mid-Atlantic region.

How to Raise a Veggie-Eating Kid

By Faith Hicks, MS, RD, LD/N, CSP

Senior Clinical Dietitian

Editor’s Note: A version of this article appeared in The Baltimore Sun 03/07/12, in the Taste section and online.

How is it that some kids will eat whatever is put in front of them, while others live on hot dogs and chicken nuggets and have a phobia for vegetables, especially anything green?  As adults, we know that we ourselves probably should be eating more fruits and vegetables, and we would like to raise our kids to have healthier eating habits and a varied diet right from the start.  There are a number of ways parents and other adults can promote good eating habits from early childhood and throughout the teen years.

Make a regular “date night” – a family dinner date night, that is!

One of the best ways of promoting good eating habits in children is to make eating meals together a priority. This is something that often gets lost in the shuffle of soccer practice and scout meetings, but try to identify at least one or two nights a week to have dinner as a family.  Children who are raised having regular family meals generally consume more servings of fruits and vegetables and develop a liking for a wider variety.  They also tend to have a diet lower in fat and are less likely to become overweight than children from families who eat on the run.  From the start, toddlers mimic their parents’ eating habits.  So a parent who includes fruits and vegetables at mealtimes sets the example that these foods are tasty and that consuming them is the norm and is expected.

There are other important benefits of having meals as a family. Children whose families dine together regularly develop better language skills.  During dinner conversation, they are exposed to a larger vocabulary. They become adept at participating in a higher level conversation.  Another benefit of family meals extends into the teen years, teens that regularly have dinner with the family get better grades and are less likely to try drugs, tobacco, and alcohol.  It seems that mealtimes help foster a sense of connectedness within the family and when parents are tuned into their teens, teens are less tempted to dabble in risky behavior. 

Lighten up and don’t turn mealtime into a “pressure cooker”

Another way of fostering a varied diet is to offer new foods several times and without undue pressure.  It may take more than several times trying a new food for a toddler or preschooler to accept it, so don’t give up after the first try! Place a small portion of each food that you are having on your child’s plate.  When they see that you eat it, the expectation is set that they will like it, too.  Beware of trying too hard to persuade a child to eat because this might backfire! It can send the message that the food item is not very appealing.  For example, if a child is rewarded for eating green beans by getting a cookie, the parent sends a message that green beans are yucky.  The child may think “that must not taste very good if I have to be bribed with treat.”  Rather, make a light-hearted request for the child to just to try “just a bite.”

Involve kids in food shopping and preparation.

Children and teens are more interested in foods they have selected, prepared, or even grown at home.  Wander the produce section of the grocery store with your child and let him choose a new vegetable or fruit to try each week.  Buy a colorful, child-oriented cookbook to provide ideas for foods you can prepare together.  Cooking together provides an opportunity to learn other skills, such as fractions.  Even small children can be safely involved in cooking activities such as washing produce or putting toppings on a veggie pizza. Consider planting even a small garden and check out seed displays with your child. Seed companies sell kid-friendly vegetables in packets bearing very appealing pictures. Children who are drawn to miniature things may be fascinated by picking cherry tomatoes or pulling from the ground the baby carrots planted earlier in the spring. Brussels sprouts might be a little more fun to eat once you have seen how they seem to march in lines as they grow from the plant’s stem! 

In summary, the key to raising a “good eater” is having fun with food together, right from the start.

10 Healthy Lunch Tips: Add Punch to Your Kid’s Lunch!

Childhood obesity is a growing public health crisis among children and adolescents that has continued to rise every year.  To address this epidemic, the University of  Maryland, in partnership with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, sponsored  The Summit on Childhood Obesity  November 15-16, 2011, at the Hilton Baltimore Hotel.  

The purpose of the University of Maryland’s Summit on Childhood Obesity is to exchange information, educate and engage prominent figures at the local and federal levels in discussions about how to confront the problem and develop an action plan to promote a healthier lifestyle for children and families.  Below, UMMC Nutritionist Shanti Lewis offers 10 healthy lunch tips to help pack a fun, healthy lunch for your kids.

 

by Shanti Lewis, RD, LDN, CSP, CNSD

Since 1 out of 3 children in the U.S.  is overweight or obese, parents play a vital role in teaching children healthy eating habits and helping them maintain a healthy weight.  One of the ways that parents can help children learn about nutrition is by getting them involved in preparing meals.  Getting kids involved in preparing their school lunch helps them learn about portion control and allows them to select healthy foods that they enjoy.

  • Choose the good stuff! Plenty of fruits, veggies, beans, lean meats, low-fat dairy and whole grains.
  • Make fun shapes! Use cookie cutters for flower, heart, star, or snowflake sandwich bites. Form a funny face, mermaid body, or spooky spider shape.
  • Get your kids involved! Have them pick pasta shapes, their favorite fresh fruits, nuts, seeds and veggies.
  • Utilize leftovers from last night’s dinner or today’s breakfast: think pizza bites, egg roll-ups, or mini bagels with low-fat cream cheese.
  • Remember food safety: Keep the hot foods HOT and the cold foods COLD. Use insulated lunchboxes with ice packs and a thermos for soup.
  • Choose water or low-fat milk in place of juice or sugary drinks.
  • Watch the salt! Select lower sodium lunchmeats and cheeses.
  • Find the fiber: Choose whole grain crackers, breads, wraps, and muffins. Try popcorn or whole wheat pretzels as a substitute for chips.
  • Be creative! Offer a variety of different textures, shapes, and colors from local and seasonal fruits and vegetables.
  • Decorate plastic bags with fun stickers, jot a note on the banana or orange skin, and tuck a handwritten love note inside the lunchbox.

Additional Resources

Shanti Lewis is a neonatal nutritionist at the University of Maryland Medical Center.  She is an author and frequent contributor to blogs and articles on fitness and nutrition. Lewis received her bachelor’s in nutrition and food science from Drexel University and completed her dietetic internship at the National Institutes of Health.