University of Maryland Ear, Nose & Throat Team Preparing, Fundraising for Annual Volunteer Medical Mission

The University of Maryland Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) team is gearing up for their next volunteer medical mission trip – and they’re hoping you can help them help more people. The team, led by head and neck surgeons Rodney Taylor, MD and Jeffrey Wolf, MD, has begun fundraising for their March 2017 medical mission to Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Fiji Team

The ENT Team during last year’s mission trip to Fiji

Every year, the ENT team travels to different under-served parts of the world to provide their services free of charge. The crew is dedicated to providing world-class care to those in need. They pay 100 percent of their own way, including airfare, shipping costs for their equipment and the cost of purchasing additional supplies not available onsite.

This year, the funds raised will also pay for patient transportation. While there is one hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, many Vietnamese citizens living in the rural hills don’t have easy access to health care. In fact, some of them have never even been to a hospital. This year, the ENT team will be covering the funds to get patients from their homes to the hospital to receive the care they need.

In Vietnam, Dr. Taylor says there is a higher rate of cleft lip and cleft palate, so they expect to see a lot of patients suffering from those conditions. The team also is planning to treat many patients with goiters (enlarged thyroid), parotid tumors (in the salivary glands), sinal nasal masses and even some cancers.

“It’s an area where we can make the biggest impact during our time there,” Dr. Taylor said. “We will also get the chance to soak in the culture, and learn valuable lessons from the patients we serve.”

Another huge win for the team, and the patients in turn, is the addition of a pediatric anesthesiologist to this year’s crew. That means the team will able to operate on children needing surgery, not just adults.

The ENT team is working with the Project Vietnam Foundation, a nonprofit humanitarian organization working to create sustainable pediatric health care in Vietnam, while providing free health care and aid to impoverished rural areas across the country.

All of the ENT mission trips are made possible through donations. If you cannot make it to the happy hour, donations are welcome on the Maryland ENT Mission website: http://www.marylandentmissions.org/donate.


­­­­Last year, the team traveled to Fiji for their annual medical mission. They performed 15 surgeries and saw 150 patients before the island was rocked by Cyclone Winston. Learn more here.

UMMC Hosts Paintfest America

By Kirsten Bannan, System Communications Intern

For patients diagnosed with cancer, treatment may mean having surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, or a combination of all three. But, cancer patients at the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMGCCC) recently were treated to another type of therapy — one that indulged their inner artist and helped them step away from their illness for a moment.

The UMGCCC hosted a PaintFest America event July 7, and dozens of patients, staff members and family members spent the morning painting colorful canvas murals set up on tables in two locations in the cancer center. Several patients who weren’t able to join in the group activity even had the opportunity to paint in their hospital rooms.

The Foundation for Hospital Art is bringing PaintFest to cancer centers in every state as part of a 50day national tour that will end in New York City August 23. The nonprofit organization’s goal is to bring together families, patients and staff at cancer facilities in each state though art. “Paintfest America was nothing short of fabulous,” says Madison Friz, a 16-year-old leukemia patient who took part in the UMGCCC event after a week-long hospital stay. “As a cancer patient, it feels really good to know there are people out there in this world who care about you. To leave my hospital room to paint a picture and forget my sickness is a feeling I can’t even describe.”

UMGCCC was the only stop in Maryland on the tour, and Madison was chosen to help paint the state’s panel featuring a Baltimore oriole and a black-eyed Susan. All of the state panels will be assembled into a 10- by-15-foot mural on the final day of the tour and then returned to the hospitals where they were painted.

One of the volunteers, Morgan Feight, whose grandfather John Feight started the Foundation for Hospital Art, says that artwork provides a welcome distraction to patients and family members once the art is mounted on the walls.”

“Oftentimes, patients view hospitals as drab, starkly sterile buildings. By hanging vibrant murals throughout the hallways, we hope to change patients’ perspective and give them a sense of rejuvenating joy and hope as they stare at the designs,” she says.

Peggy Torr, a UMGCC nurse for more than 30 years, says patients were excited to take up paintbrushes and paint to participate in this event. “They were a part of something much bigger for the moment – an opportunity to calm the spirit and fuel the soul. It was palpable!”

She adds, “As healthcare professionals, we can be so task-oriented that having the opportunity to do something for our patients, instead of to them, was just amazing.”

Fighting Violence with Art; Art Against Violence 2016 Gallery Show

Gallery ShowMany thanks to all of the student artists who made the Art Against Violence 2016 Gallery Show a success!

The show featured nearly 50 works of art from local City School students across a range of mediums, including print, colored pencil, watercolor and a sculpture of found objects.

The following winners were announced:

Trinity K.
Peace and Justice 4 All
Renaissance Academy

Jenelda A.
Black Lives Matter!
Renaissance Academy

Bella S.
Nature or Nurture? From the Cradle to the Grave
Baltimore School for the Arts

Awards were presented by our panel of guest judges:

Dr. Carnell Cooper
Violence Intervention Program Founder

Dr. Jane Lipscomb
University of Maryland School of Nursing

Anisha Thomas
Special Assistant to the Deputy Commissioner, Baltimore City Health Department

Thanks again to all participants for bringing awareness to National Youth Violence Prevention Week.
Follow the conversation on social media: #nyvpweek16

Trinity

Jane Lipscomb and Jenelda

Bella

Gallery Show turnout

 

Lots of submissions!

Art Against Violence cake

Shock Trauma Survivor Stresses Need for Blood Donations, Holds Blood Drive

The last thing Katie Pohler remembers from June 28 is pedaling her bike down Route 450 South in the bike lane, heading to the Waterfront in Annapolis with her boyfriend. But then, it all goes black.

Katie and her boyfriend, Todd Green, were both hit from behind by an impaired driver, and had to be flown to the R Adams Crowley Shock Trauma Center.

While Todd was released that night, Katie spent nearly three weeks in Shock Trauma, undergoing multiple surgeries and recovering from her extensive list of injures. She broke her left leg and arm, and her right hand, collarbone and shoulder, and her trachea was crushed, among other injuries.

During her stay in Shock Trauma, Katie, 23, received multiple blood transfusions while fighting for her life, which is why her friends and family have decided to organize a blood drive in her honor.

pohler

“Having had a transfusion, I understand the importance of donating blood to save lives. I am going to give blood any chance I get,” Katie says.

Coming up with the idea for the drive was Katie’s neighbor and family friend, Candy McCann Fontz. Fontz, who has hosted blood drives before, felt this was a perfect way to support the family during such a trying time and help others.

“I know the power of what my donation does because I have seen it,” Fontz says of why blood drives are so important.

When Fontz brought the idea up to Katie and her family, it was unanimous that this was a perfect way to honor Katie’s recovery.

“I feel wonderful about doing this blood drive because I want to give back. Everybody helped Katie and so I want to be able to help others.” Donna Pohler, Katie’s mother, says.

The blood drive will be held from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Nov. 15 at the Glen Burnie Improvement Association, located at 19 S. Crain Highway, Glen Burnie. To schedule an appointment, head to www.redcrossblood.org and enter sponsor code GBIA.

“It’s about giving back and educating people on why it is important to donate,” Donna says.

According to the American Red Cross, every two seconds someone in the U.S. needs blood and more than 41,000 blood donations are required every day. The need for blood can be for emergency cases or for patients with conditions that require multiple transfusions, such as cancer patients going through chemotherapy or patients diagnosed with sickle cell disease.

Katie is currently going to physical therapy three times a week, and getting stronger every day. Her recovery process will be a long road, and some injuries will have more lasting effects than others.

“I just had vocal cord surgery and my voice is a lot different from what it used to be, but I am just thankful to have a voice at all,” Katie says.

Katie’s stay at Shock Trauma saved her life, and she says she is grateful to all the doctors and nurses who helped aid in her recovery, and to those who have taken the time to donate blood.

“I just can’t stress it enough how important it is to give blood,” Katie says. “You never expect that one day you are going to be in that situation where you need it.”

For more information on the blood drive, head online to the event’s Facebook page set up or call the Red Cross directly at 1-800-733-2767 to set up an appointment.

Art Exhibit Showcases Talent of UMMC Staff

In 2013, the University of Maryland Medical Center’s C2X Healing Arts Team and the National Arts Program co-sponsored the hospital’s first employee art exhibition. In response to the overwhelmingly positive feedback, this year’s exhibit will remain open two weeks longer than the 2013 exhibition, giving patients, visitors and employees alike extra time to view these one-of-a-kind pieces. The art will remain mounted in the Weinberg Atrium through Nov. 5.

This year’s exhibition features 192 pieces of artwork by UMMC staff and their families, a significant increase in participants from the previous year. Hospital staff from nearly every service area contributed projects, including submissions from 34 artists who contributed to last year’s display.

 

The artists submitted a wide selection of works, including paintings, photography, crafts, sketches, mixed media and various forms of sculpture. A notable number of submissions carry a distinctive Baltimore theme. “These artists have immeasurable talent, and we are fortunate to showcase their work in our hallways,” said Rachel Hercenberg, supervisor of oncology operations for the Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center.

Baltimore artists Cinder Hypki, Will Williams and Robert McClintock returned from the previous year to judge the competition and presented awards to the winning artists at a ceremony on October 2. Hypki, a community artist and faculty member in the MFA Program in Community Arts at MICA, explores art and ritual as a means of overcoming loss or pain. She has assisted the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in the cultivation of healing art for over five years. Williams is a MICA graduate with a background in fine arts, illustration and portrait painting. His award-winning work is featured in Massachusetts and Maryland galleries. McClintock is a self-taught visionary and combines photography and digital painting into iconic representations of Baltimore. He is a three-time finalist at MacWorld’s annual juried digital art competition.

The judges distributed $2,400 in National Arts Program awards to 21 winning artists from five categories: Youth, Teen, Adult Amateur, Adult Intermediate and Adult Professional. McClintock also presented a special Best in Show award to a 7-year-old recipient. Black-and-white photography and modern paintings featured prominently among the wining pieces. After the closing of the exhibit in November, the People’s Choice Award will be presented to the artist with the most votes from exhibition guests. UMMC employees and visitors can vote by placing their ballot in the box on the exhibit’s glass display case.

The award ceremony featured a guitar prelude by Matt Peroutka, a member of UMMC’s Integrative Care Team and C2X Healing Arts Team. Following the awards, guests enjoyed refreshments – hors d’oeuvres and piano-shaped cookies – while Baltimore jazz pianist Lieutenant Israel Cross gave the 100th performance on the hospital’s piano.

The C2X Healing Arts Team, led by Hercenberg, is composed of hospital employees who are dedicated to using art for healing and wholeness. Kerry Sobol, MBA, RN, director of patient experience and the Commitment to Excellence program for UMMC, and Marianne Rowan Braun, director and vice president of the Commitment to Excellence program and patient experience, oversee and mentor the group. The C2X Healing Arts Team sponsors the yearly Healing Arts Exhibit and coordinates musical performances in the Healing Garden.

The 2014 Healing Arts Exhibit award winners are:

Best in Show

  • Isabel Mena, 7 (Daughter of Christine Mena, RN, Nurse ROP Coordinator, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit): “Scary”

Youth (12 and Under)

  • First place: Ethan Luu, 9 (Son of Rosanna Dinh, RN, Nurse Medication Diversion Specialist, Pharmacy): “Happy Koi”
  • Second Place: Anna Eyler, 7 (Daughter of Kristin Eyler, MPT, Senior Physical Therapist, Rehabilitation Services): “Fireworks over the city”
  • Third Place: Braydon Barski, 9 (Son of Sharon Barski, AS, Student Nurse, Pediatric Hematology and Oncology): “Super Heroes”
  • Honorable Mention: Lara Therese Eugenio, 12 (Daughter of Lovella Eugenio, BSN, CNOR, Senior Clinical Nurse I, General Operating Room): “My Dog”

Teen (13-18)

  • First place: Taylor Motley, 18 (Daughter of Jennifer Motley, BSN, PCCN, Senior Clinical Nurse II, Multi Trauma Intermediate Care Unit): “Hay Stacks”
  • Second Place: Christopher Fieden, 17 (Son of Mary Fieden, RN, Clinical Nurse II, Bone Marrow Transplant Unit): “Easy Rider”
  • Third Place: Grant Zopp, 15 (Son of Joan Zopp, OTR/L, Advanced Occupational Therapist, Psychiatric Occupational Therapy, 12 West and Harbor City Unlimited): “Self Portrait”
  • Honorable Mention: Leena Singh, 13 (Daughter of Ila Mulasi, MD, Assistant Clinical Professor, Family and Community Medicine): “Teapot”

Adult Amateur

  • First place: Laura White (RN, OCN, Senior Clinical Nurse I, Stoler Pavilion, Marlene & Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center): “Chincoteague Wild”
  • Second Place: Sarah Connolly (Daughter of Mary Ellen Connolly, NP, Nurse Practitioner, Pediatrics): “Untitled”
  • Third Place: Yoav Bachrach (Husband of Christine Bachrach, MS, CHC-F, Chief Compliance Officer, Corporate Compliance): “Cedar Bowl – Imperfection Makes Beauty”
  • Honorable Mention: Matthew Smith (MLIS, Assistant Director of Prospect Research & Management, University of Maryland Medical System Foundation): “Jordanian Sunrise”

Adult Intermediate

  • First place: Adrian Rugas (Husband of Marianne Rugas, RN, Clinical Nurse II, Cardiac Surgery Stepdown ): “Gilded”
  • Second Place: Stephanie Heydt (MT (ASCP), Medical Laboratory Scientist, Blood Bank): “Sulking”
  • Third Place: Rupal Mehta (MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology): “Man with Stool”
  • Honorable Mention: Nadia Gavrilova (MD, Resident, Family Medicine): “The Healing Garden: Orchids. Life finds a way to thrive”

Adult Professional

  • First Place: Deborah Kommalan (Mother of Martha Hoffman, RN, BSN, CNOR, Senior Clinical Nurse I, Perioperative Services ): “Make Lemonade”
  • Second Place: Linda Praley (Creative Director, Communications and Public Affairs): “Untitled 1”
  • Third Place: Annemarie DiCamillo (Daughter of Jennifer DiCamillo, Critical Care Pediatric Transport Clinical Nurse II, Maryland ExpressCare): “Tough Faith”
  • Honorable Mention: Karen Trimble (Wife of Kimball Cutler, LCSW-C, Program Coordinator, Program of Assertive Community Treatment ): “English Sky”

Keep the Beat: UMMC Hosts Dance Party for Baltimore City Senior Citizens

By Sharon Boston

Media Relations Manager for University of Maryland Medical System

More than 300 Baltimore seniors got their feet moving and their heart rates up at the University of Maryland Medical Center’s third annual “Dance for the Heart” event at the Virginia S. Baker Recreation Center in PattersonPark.

The participants came from senior centers throughout the city to take part in dance demonstrations, line-dancing and blood pressure screenings. It was a fun way to get their heart rates up, keep their feet moving and dance their way to better health. Many of them arrived already enjoying dance. Some dancers really had some signature moves, and others just enjoyed swaying. At least one dancer used his cane to safely join the fun.

Dance for the Heart video

The Medical Center, which provided “Dance for Your Heart” shirts for everyone, partnered with the Baltimore City Health Department and the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks for the event.

University of Maryland family medicine specialist Georgia Bromfield, MD, also talked to the folks about the “ABCs” of heart disease, and they had lots of questions for her.

“Dance for Your Heart” is part of the Medical Center’s community outreach efforts. The annual dance is one of a series of heart-health events the Medical Center is hosting during February, which is American Heart Month.  Be sure to visit the Medical Center at the B-More Healthy Expo, February 23-24 at the Baltimore Convention Center.

To learn more about other upcoming activities, visit our community outreach page: www.umm.edu/events

 

 

 

Free Holiday Concerts at UMMC

Three different groups will be performing holiday music at the University of Maryland Medical Center the week of December 17, most members of which are University of Maryland doctors or medical students.

The concerts, which are from noon to 1 p.m. through Dec. 21, are on UMMC’s first floor, feature the following groups:

The Not2 Cool Jazz Trio kicked off the week on Dec. 17. The Trio is led by trumpet player Michael Grasso, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and emergency medicine, who plays the trumpet.

On Dec. 18-20, The UMMC Chamber Players return for the 25th year in a row. Founded and directed by cardiologist Elijah Saunders, MD, clinical professor of medicine, the Players feature musicians and vocalists who play and sing a variety of holiday favorites. The group’s music director is Candy Carson, an accomplished musician and wife of Benjamin Carson, MD, a Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon.

Wrapping things up is Otitis Musica, a group of medical students who have performed with the UMMC Chamber Players in the past.


The UM Chamber Players perform various Christmas songs in the hospital lobby near Au Bon Pain on Dec. 18-20th 2012 as an annual tradition.

 

Super Staff Beats Super Storm — Every Time

The forecasts and predictions around Hurricane Sandy had much of the eastern third of the country braced for disaster. Baltimore saw heavy rains, wind and flooding. But the University of Maryland Medical Center didn’t skip a beat, thanks to the dedication of staff members who planned ahead or braved the elements to get to work. Their inspiration: hundreds of patients and colleagues were depending on them.

 We heard about staff taking extraordinary steps to be available for patients and to one another. If you have a story of your own, or you know of something that somebody else has done, drop us a line at communications@umm.edu.

 In the meantime, here are a few:

 From Karen E. Doyle, MBA, MS, RN, NEA-BC, vice president for nursing and operations at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center and for emergency nursing at UMMC:

“While I was making rounds yesterday [Oct. 29], I stopped and spoke to Darlene Currin, a housekeeping staff member in Shock Trauma working on 6 North.  I thanked her for being here, and told her that her work was really important.  She told me that she had just arrived (it was around 10:30 or 11:00 a.m.).  Darlene had walked all the way from East Baltimore to UMMC.  But, she knew she was needed and made the trek anyway.  Really unbelievable.  I was so inspired.”

 Currin (pictured above) said she doesn’t think she did anything that most of her colleagues wouldn’t do. “We all work here, we know it’s 24/7,” she said. On Monday morning, she was unable to get a taxi or sedan service (public transportation was shut down), so she decided to walk. It took her about 90 minutes.

 “I was soaked when I got here,” Currin said.

 From Monika Bauman, MS, RN, CEN, nurse manager for women’s and children’s ambulatory services:

“The hospital-based clinics officially closed on Tuesday due to the storm, but Ometriss Jeter, a scheduling and preauthorization coordinator who works in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, reported for duty Tuesday morning at about 6 a.m.  She rounded in all of the outpatient registration areas offering her services and making sure they had adequate staffing for the day. Once she determined all was well, she reported to our clinic, even though it was closed, to be sure we were ready for operations as usual for tomorrow [Wednesday].”

 From Karen Cossentino, MS, RN, CCRN, senior clinical nurse II and charge nurse in the Cardiac Care Unit:

“I was in charge in the Cardiac Care Unit on Monday, Oct. 29, and it was an exceptionally busy day. So I would like to thank all the staff for working together. Two nurses deserve an extra thank you, but they asked that I not use their names. One of them had a vacation scheduled this week but offered to work for a nurse who is a new mother who would not have been able to get home after work on Monday to her 3-month-old baby.  Another nurse from Professional Development came to the unit and asked if we needed any help. I immediately took her up on her offer and she stayed most of the day and went from room to room and nurse to nurse and offered her assistance.”

From Rehana Qayyumi, MLS (ASCP), medical lab scientist, Microbiology Laboratory:

After making up my mind to stay [at work during the storm] on a very busy Monday, I did not have time to think about where I would stay after my shift. Then, our wonderful Microbiology Technical Specialist Donna Cashara, MLS(ASCP), asked me what I was  going to do.  I just told her, ‘Yes, I’m staying somewhere,’ while very busy with my assigned work.  Anyway, she personally walked two blocks away to the Marriott [as phone calls were not helpful] and reserved a room.  She was like an angel for me when I finally reached the room around 7 p.m. and took a shower and my medicines and bowed my head down for my unexpected landing in full luxury. Did I deserve it? Yes, I think all of us who decided to pay for comfortable accommodations to be ready for the next busy day deserved it.  We deserve all the best to provide the best services. TeamWORK works!”

Rehana Qayyumi and Donna Cashara

Rehana Qayyumi and Donna Cashara

Cashara said it was tough to get a room at an affordable rate that night at the downtown hotels, but the Marriott finally came through. She said many other seasoned lab staff know when storms are coming, they need to look out for each other. She and another staff person led a department-wide effort to make sure the hospital had enough lab staff and that those employees had either safe passage home or a place to sleep. The hospital provides dorm-like accommodations, but some staff prefer to split the cost of a nearby hotel room.

From Cassandra Bembry, MLS ASCP, outreach customer service supervisor for the Clinical Pathology Laboratory:

Jamillah Johnson, my front-end coordinator of the Clinical Pathology Laboratory (a.k.a. “Accessioning”) volunteered late Sunday night to pick up more than 80 percent of our day-shift staff for Monday who rely solely on public transportation.  She also took these employees home and picked up our evening shift crew.  Jamillah has consistently shown a great deal of care and concern for our staff that is unparalleled, in my opinion, and acts of this nature are routine for her.” 

 From J.V. Nable, MD, NREMT-P, clinical instructor and chief resident in the Department of  Emergency Medicine:

“The [physicians in the] UniversityofMaryland Emergency Medicine Residency met the challenges posed by Hurricane Sandy head-on. Despite the incredibly inclement weather, residents continued to provide vital services at emergency departments and other hospital units throughout the region, including: UMMC, the Shock Trauma Center, the Baltimore VA Medical Center, Mercy Medical Center, Bayview Medical Center, and Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC. Because some residents have lengthy commutes, those who live near the medical facilities invited them to their homes for dry and safe shelter during the storm. Many residents volunteered to rearrange their schedules, taking extra shifts to cover for those stranded by the storm. As part of the backbone of clinical services at UMMC, emergency medicine residents demonstrated unwavering dedication throughout this unprecedented event.”

From Shawn Hendricks, MSN, RN, nurse manager for 10 East (Acute Medicine Telemetry Unit) and 11 East (Medicine Telemetry Unit):
 
During Hurricane Sandy, the dedicated staff on 10 & 11 East showed up ready to work, with smiles and a determination to provide excellent care despite the weather outside. I gave personal thanks to patient care technicians Theresa Hicks and Danielle Brown for coming to assist with the patients on 11 East after completing their care on 10 East, until help arrived from Monique Thomas, a student nurse who had been off duty but came in to help. And, also, to Jocelyn Campbell, one of our unit secretaries, who came in even when she wasn’t scheduled, to help with secretarial duties and other tasks on 11 East. Finally, a big “Thank you” to all my staff who stayed late or came early to ensure the shifts were covered! These staff members showed loyalty, teamwork, and caring when it was needed the most!

UMMS “Spring Into Good Health” Event Gets Shoppers Dancing in the Center Court at Mondawmin Mall

By Sharon Boston

UMMC Media Relations Manager

Each spring, the University of Medical System (UMMS) hosts “Spring Into Good Health,” a free event attended by hundreds of people who receive medical screenings (such as blood pressure and cholesterol), talk one-on-one with University of Maryland Medical System health professionals and pick up information on men’s and women’s health, child safety, nutrition and more.

This year, the UMMS Community Outreach and Advocacy Committee wanted to put a focus on fitness and hosted a dance party right in the middle of Mondawmin Mall!

Several guests commented that they didn’t realize that fitness could be so fun, and that they plan to try to exercise more and eat better, thanks to the information that they picked up at the UMMS event.

Take a look at the some of the line dancing that got people of all ages up and moving.

 “The dancing was really upbeat and lively, it really got people moving,” said Donna Jacobs, UMMS senior vice president for government relations. “Several people told us that they’d like to see even more fun physical activities next year.”

Five of the 12 hospitals in the University of Maryland Medical System took part in the event — the University of Maryland Medical Center, Maryland General Hospital, Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital, University Specialty Hospital and Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital. The event was also sponsored by Maryland Physicians Care, Total Health Care, Coppin State University School of Nursing and Radio One, Baltimore.

How Cool is That?

Being chosen as a Leapfrog “Top Hospital” for quality and safety six years in a row is so cool that the only way to celebrate was with ice cream.

UMMC is one of only two hospitals in the country to meet the increasingly stringent criteria for this list every year since it was initiated by The Leapfrog Group.

To thank the entire staff for the effort that makes UMMC a top hospital, President and CEO Jeffrey A. Rivest invited everyone to take an ice cream break during their shifts and to savor the moment. In the Weinberg Atrium, members of the Employee Celebrations Team handed out ice cream bars and cones and frozen-fruit bars to staff – as well as to several patients and visitors who happened to be in the right place at the right time.

“UMMC has earned this continual recognition by The Leapfrog Group because of the multidisciplinary teams that define us and the invaluable members who comprise these teams — doctors, nurses, pharmacists, therapists, technicians, support staff and leaders at all levels,” Rivest said. “Thank you for the role you play in continuing to make safety and quality a top priority and for giving all of us yet another reason to be proud. Take a moment to celebrate your part in earning this award for the Medical Center.”