Pediatric Residents at Univeristy of Maryland Reach Out and Read

A string of rainy days in Baltimore made Friday the perfect day to stay inside and read a good book. And thanks to the efforts of some hard-working Pediatric Residents at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, more than 200 students in Baltimore City had a new story to read!

Throughout the morning, the pediatricians-to-be visited several schools in the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital community, including James McHenry Elementary-Middle School and Franklin Square Elementary in West Baltimore. They spent time interacting with the students, with the hopes of promoting a healthy attitude toward development and literacy at a young age.

James McHenry students had a special visitor: Baltimore City Council President Jack Young handed out books and spent time reading to four classrooms of Pre-K and Kindergarten students.

The Maryland Book Bank and the Maryland Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics donated the 200 books that went home with students.

The day of reading was a part of a nationwide “ROAR: Reach Out and Read” effort, which is a non-profit that works to incorporate books and literacy into pediatric care.

Friday was also designated as a “Call to Action” Day by the American Academy of Pediatrics to F.A.C.E Poverty: promote Food Security, Access to Health Care, Community, and Education.

Celebrating Unsung Superheroes: Social Workers

By: Allie Ondrejcak, Communications Intern

“Never be afraid to do what’s right, especially if the health and happiness of another person or an animal is at stake. The punishments of the society are small compared to the damage we inflict on our soul when we look the other way and do nothing.” – Martin Luther King, Jr.

The profession of social work follows this mission: enhance human well-being and help people meet their basic human needs—particularly the needs and empowerment of people who are vulnerable, oppressed or living in poverty. At the University of Maryland Medical Center, this population is served by the Department of Social Work. The Department helps patients with complex psychosocial needs such as: lack of resources, limited family support, communication barriers or maladjustment to illness. The Department of Social Work believes that recognizing the relationship between social and emotional factors is an important aspect of helping patients. And, because they are aware of the relationship, they are able to understand how it impacts illness.social-work-7

Here at UMMC, social work has been an integral part of the care system since the early 20th century! The first Department of Social Work at the University Hospital was established in 1919. At that time the Department saw every patient who came to the hospital as they were admitted and they provided follow-up and home visits to all patients after discharge. These measures helped to prevent recurrence of illness and readmission to the hospital. Over the years, the Department grew to include teaching programs, casework discussions, community outreach and hospital-wide policies and procedures. Today, the Department is committed to promoting education, professional development and research, all of which are part of the commitment to excellence in medical social work. The Department of Social Work also oversees Palliative Care, Pastoral Care Services and the Patient Advocacy Department at UMMC.

I spoke with UMMC’s Social Work Manager, Catherine Miller, LCSW-C, and asked her to give me a closer look at the department. Here is an overview of what they do and why they are special:

  • Social workers at UMMC start their days at 9:00AM—often much earlier—with Interdisciplinary Rounds (social workers, doctors and nurses use their clinical expertise to coordinate patient care and discuss patients’ discharge). During these rounds, social workers meet with patients and families to prepare for discharge and to assess psychosocial barriers for a patient’s discharge. Oftentimes, social workers work with the outpatient population as well.
  • In addition to the complex needs of patients in hospitals and the psychological impact of hospitalization and injury, medical social workers have to know about all other facets of social work, such as family, community and child social work. These professionals have to work extremely fast to build relationships with patients because they may only get to meet with them a few times, sometimes less!

Ms. Miller explained that being a social worker at UMMC is very rewarding because they are able to help patients and family work through the most important events in their lives—from the joys of birth to the sorrows of death.

The Department is full of dedicated professionals but Ms. Miller wants to recognize a few “shining stars!”

  • Iris Smith—retiring in March after 45 YEARS of Social Work service at UMMC!
    • She was here when the first patient with HIV was treated at UMMC
    • Smith also was here during the Civil Rights movement
  • Justin Perry, Shannon Mullins and Crystal Johnson who have been vital in assisting with the Department’s restructuring with Care Management.
  • Kathy Klein, Chelsea Needle and Carlyn Mast, three social workers who worked very hard to plan the department’s first Social Work Month and organized an information booth at the hospital.

These amazing staff members are part of an equally amazing team. I know first-hand that social workers are passionate, committed and often underappreciated professionals. Social work is dear to my heart because my sister, a licensed clinical social worker, has dedicated her life to helping those who need it most. My sUM_School_SocialWork_RGB_webister earned her degree from the University of Maryland School of Social Work and has worked as a child and family therapist for a non-profit organization and as a Child Protective Services agent. She is now a Behavioral Health Case Manager for a hospital and works with their Outpatient Program. The passion she has for helping those who are too vulnerable to help themselves and her commitment to fairness and justice is so apparent. These values are in the hearts of all dedicated social workers and the world needs more people like this! Our Social Workers here at UMMC exemplify these traits every day in their work with patients and families.

You can reach the UMMC Department of Social Work at 410-328-6700 their hours of operation are Monday-Friday, 8:00 am – 4:30 pm. The Department also provides after-hour referrals, weekend in-house coverage in Shock Trauma and both the Adult and Pediatric Emergency Departments and on-call service.

Thank you to all social workers and a special thank you to our very own social workers at UMMC for all that you do! The world is a better place because of you!

Ear, Nose & Throat Team Returns from Medical Mission after Cyclone Winston Rocks Fiji


A 12-person team of nurses, surgeons, residents and anesthesiologists from the University of Maryland Medical Center have returned from their medical mission in Fiji.   Team members performed 15 surgeries and saw 150 patients before Tropical Cyclone Winston rocked the islands.   Watch the video above to hear about the mission from the team themselves.

 

March of Dimes Thanks UMMC During Day of Gratitude

The March of Dimes recognized the University of Maryland Medical Center during their Day of Gratitude, Wednesday, Jan. 6. Staff at the UMMC Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) received a plaque to commemorate their efforts to support the March of Dimes mission to improve the health of babies.

UMMC is one of 33 Maryland hospitals to earn banner recognition from the March of Dimes as part of its “Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait” campaign, which aims to reduce the number of elective births before a full term of 39 weeks. The March of Dimes partners with the Maryland State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the Maryland Patient Safety Center to award banners.

P1060257

Left to right: Katie Stover (MoD), Jennifer Tarr (MoD),  Treza James, Joan Treacy, Caroline McGinnis, Danielle Luers, Dr. El-Metwally, Jane Munoz, Dr. Bearer, Sara Bielecki (MoD), Penelope Shields

Thanks to our staff for all you do to keep babies healthy!

Learn more about the NICU at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital or visit the Maryland March of Dimes website.

 

Governor Larry Hogan Visits the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

“Heading to my fifth round of five-day, 24-hour chemo this morning at the University of Maryland Medical System in Baltimore. As always thank you to everyone for your prayers and support during this journey!

Before my treatment I took some time to visit the brand-new, world-class Drs. Rouben and Violet Jiji Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at UMMS which officially opened on Tuesday. There I met families with children being treated at the NICU and listened to the stories of Baby Rebecca, Baby Ilyanna, and Baby Javion who are on the road to recovery following bouts with a range of health challenges such as infections, cardiac abnormalities, and abdominal complications. They are carefully cared for, with a balance of compassion and unparalleled clinical excellence!

The work these incredible doctors and nurses at the NICU do is amazing and they are saving lives every day! Please keep these families in your thoughts and prayers!”

-Governor Larry Hogan

Gov. Hogan NICU 1Gov. Hogan NICU 2Gov. Hogan NICU 3Gov. Hogan NICU 5Gov. Hogan NICU 6

 

Great Moments from Great Stories

By: Adrian Rabin and Michelle Logan, Editorial Interns

A written letter conveys a certain kind of emotional power. Throughout the year, former patients and their families take the time to thank their UMMC care providers through personal notes and emails. The Employee Engagement Team, part of UMMC’s Commitment to Excellence (C2X) staff, selects a few such letters to recognize our employees in an event known as Great Stories.

On June 30, we welcomed back three individuals — a patient, a family member and a friend of a patient — who spoke about the excellent standard of care they received and the compassionate staff they came in contact with.

Treatment teams were reunited with their patients, and through tears and laughter, the patients, families and friends had the opportunity to express their gratitude and show how well they were progressing.

Below are excerpts from the letters:

Great Service: excerpts from Tessa Abate’s letter

Barrett Quick Great StoriesA close friend of mine was admitted to the Bone Marrow unit on Gudelsky 9 for what we hope will be her chance for a remission for her disease. Early last week, she was required to leave the unit for an X-ray. This, for her, was very scary because of her risk for infection. I was on the unit visiting at the time, and had the pleasure to meet Shawn Quick, who arrived to transport her. I was able to share with him her level of anxiety and concern before he organized her to go to X-ray. To say he was a breath of sunshine is to understate the impact he had on Jennifer. He was cheery, organized and extraordinarily personable. As he chatted to her on the way to X-ray, I saw her anxiety visibly diminish. He responded to her questions in such an upbeat manner; her confidence regarding being in good hands was evident.

The impression Shawn left on us both is that we are so very lucky to have him taking care of our patients. We are also so fortunate to have (Sean Barrett) in charge of this very important service for our patients. I am sure he has a very difficult job, but you would never know it from his attitude. The experience we both had that day made a difference, and his compassion and personal touch were so very much appreciated. Thank you.

 

Great Dedication: Excerpts from Scott Goodstein’s letter

Goodstein Great StoriesAs a patient of UMMC Shock Trauma from multiple injuries sustained in a motorcycle accident in April 2013, I got to know your staff, and a few stuck out that went above and beyond. Dr. [Jason] Nascone’s entire team in the outpatient pavilion are all class acts, and are some of the most dedicated individuals I have ever met. All of the nurses and assistants were dedicated and understanding.

When I look back at my healing process and many visits over the last year and a half, one employee of the outpatient facility really stood out. Ms. Annie Williams kindly helped me through many stages of X-rays from the early days when it was hard to get on the X-ray table, to the much later and easier process. She was polite, professional and truly empathetic. She remembered me between visits and gave me words of encouragement as I progressed. She had both a great sense of humor and a professional manner that made getting through painful positioning to take X-rays … bearable! Your team is clearly lucky to have such a dedicated employee on your staff!

 

Great Care: Excerpts from Enid Valentine’s letter

Enid Valentine Great StoriesOver the last three years, I have functioned as advocate and power of attorney for my husband, Gulf War Veteran Steven L. Valentine. Considering the full range of services that UMMC has to offer, it is refreshing to know that Steven has found the good fortune and dual advantage of having some of the most remarkable networks of reliable professionals to collaborate with his VA medical team. … I wish to acknowledge the many competent hands and unconditional support that my husband has received at UMMC. Over time, the combined investments of these fine individuals have become the binding force that I currently value and respect.

This success story truly captures the vision of good medicine, as Steven has now been given a clearer path to favorable beginnings. Apparently, UMMC has just what it takes to make life happen for those who need it the most. You don’t simply mend bodies; you heal families.

 

For more information on the Great Stories program, or to submit your own story, email GreatStories@umm.edu.

UMMC Community Partnership with Building STEPS

Continuing his efforts to support the Baltimore community, President and CEO of UMMC and UMMC Midtown Campus, Jeffrey A. Rivest, lays out one of our partnership programs with Building STEPS and addresses the need for further action.

Read his message to all UMMC employees:

Dear Colleagues,

In my letter to you on Monday, I promised more information about how UMMC will play an essential role in the recovery and the rebuilding the fabric of our community after the events of last week. As one of Baltimore’s largest employers, we are deeply immersed in our community’s challenges and successes. We are very proud of the many community programs to which we contribute time, people, healthcare information and financial support — you can learn about many of those in our 2014 Community Benefits Report.

Today I’d like to highlight one particular program in which we are involved, Building STEPS, which exemplifies our commitment to Baltimore’s youth and helping them develop career ideas and opportunities for better lives. Last month, Building STEPS recognized UMMC for 15 years of partnership.

steps_logo

Building STEPS (Science Technology and Educational Partnerships Inc.) is a non-profit built on one simple premise: a college education changes a person’s life. The multi-year program, supplementing students’ classroom learning, exposes bright, underserved high school students from Baltimore City and County to science and technology-based careers, and helps them excel in these fields where people of color are overwhelmingly underrepresented. Juniors visit businesses and institutions, such as UMMC, which rely on science and technology. Each seminar includes a site visit and guest speakers, providing exposure to a variety of professional opportunities. These seminars encourage the students to consider careers that might have otherwise seemed unimaginable.

A few more facts about Building STEPS:

  • More than 80 percent of Building STEPS students have earned or are on track to earn a college degree
  • Almost half of Building STEPS’ college graduates go on to earn an advanced degree
  • 85 percent of Building STEPS students are the first in their family to go to college.

In the last 4 years alone, UMMC has hosted nearly 70 Building STEPS students to get a glimpse of the life-changing care we provide to patients every day. We have employed 20 of these students as paid summer interns, and have joyfully watched many of them to go on to thrive in college, including a young man named Victor. Victor was an intern in our IT department back in the Summer of 2007, and continued working with us throughout his senior year of high school. Victor graduated from Johns Hopkins University in 2013. In Victor’s words:

Through the University of Maryland Medical Center’s Career Development, I have learned from others that life is not about the adversities we go through, but about how we overcome those adversities and use them to build character that will positively impact others… Every day I strive to be an individual who makes a difference, no matter how small it is. I know that the University of Maryland Medical Center has and will continue to be a part in my effort to make a difference.”

We take pride in our participation in programs such as Building STEPS, as we open doors of inspiration and opportunity to the youth in our community. It is our responsibility as a major regional employer and civic leader to help wherever we can, and there is no better time than now to recommit ourselves to the important and fulfilling task of providing critical partnerships for job readiness, skill development, community health, and career opportunities. I am proud of what we have done, but there is much more to do to help our city and our neighbors.

I will continue to share information with you about our relationships with our community on a regular basis. Thank you again for all you do for UMMC and our City.

rivest_jeffreySincerely,

Jeffrey A. Rivest
President and Chief Executive Officer

Healing with Baltimore

Following the events in Baltimore over the past week, UMMC and UMMC Midtown Campus President and CEO, Jeffrey A. Rivest, expressed his gratitude to all those UMMC employees who helped keep the Center’s mission in mind during such a difficult time. UMMC plays an integral role in the Baltimore community and will continue to work for the betterment of the city and the nation moving forward.

Read his message to all UMMC employees:

Dear Colleagues,

The past week is one we will never forget. Today, our city begins to recover and heal. But while we begin the healing process, let us not forget the valuable lessons we have learned about the need for all who live and work in our city to be partners for change.

FB-OneBaltimore_1While we begin a long healing process, let me thank you again for your unwavering dedication to our mission and to our role in supporting quality of life through taking care of people in their time of need. Many of our colleagues did not miss a single hour of work, despite their need to plan for the safety of their families. They faced difficulty in getting to and from work, and for some, there was no ability to reach their homes safely. Yet while the city was in crisis, each of you remained fully committed to the needs of our patients. Despite enormous challenges, we continued to operate all hospital services normally, and most importantly, were here for those in our community who needed us.

Our ability to stay united around the singular mission of caring, despite high emotions and differences of opinion, speaks to the core of who we are and what we do. I am grateful to each of you and I am inspired by your dedication to make life better for others. We are all fortunate to have this opportunity and once again, all here at UMMC showed tremendous teamwork, respect, civility and professionalism.

I also offer my sincere thanks to our hospital Security team and our Incident Command team who worked tirelessly for over six days to support all of us, keep us informed, and keep us safe. This team exemplifies professionalism, adaptability and a commitment to serve.

It is a new week in Baltimore. The city-wide curfew has been lifted, National Guard troops are phasing out, and we can be energized by the wonderful examples of love and community we witnessed in our city this weekend. This gives us hope. However, there is a long journey ahead, and many things in our culture must change–here in Baltimore and in our nation.

Later this week, I will provide you additional information about UMMC’s essential role in the recovery and the rebuilding of the fabric of our community. As one of Baltimore’s largest employers, we have been deeply involved in our community and its challenges and successes. We have all learned lessons this past week and together with others, UMMC will recommit to providing critical partnerships for job readiness, skill development, community health, and career opportunities. While we have done much, our city and our neighborhoods need much more. We must be a part of doing more and doing it better.

rivest_jeffrey

Thank you again for all you do here at UMMC.

Sincerely,

Jeffrey A. Rivest
President and Chief Executive Officer

Volunteering at a Medical Center

By: Andrea Rizkallah, Editorial Intern

AndreaVolunteering is a rewarding activity, which is why I love my position as editorial intern in the Corporate Communications department at the University of Maryland Medical Center. I thought that I had to be a medical student in order to volunteer at a medical center, but luckily I was wrong. I was able to get an administrative position that still makes a difference and offers me great experience.

The Corporate Communications department coordinates blood drives that help save lives, updates the website with valuable information for patients and families, keeps Medical Center employees updated on training events and interviews patients to communicate their stories. Even though we are not transplanting lungs or performing surgery, we are still deeply involved with the hospital. I have completed projects that really make me feel like I am part of the team, and these contributions make me feel accomplished and useful.

The volunteer program here at the University of Maryland is great because I am getting hands on experience. I get to learn how the hospital works and what goes into the everyday functions of a medical center.  Although my role is an administrative one, I feel that I am making a difference, and that is a lot to take away from a volunteer position.

Volunteers work in all areas including the Emergency department, Shock Trauma Center, Medical Records department, Dental Clinic, Psychiatry department, and many more.  There are some requirements to volunteering at the hospital:

  • You must be at least 13 years old and be able to commit to four hours a week.
  • To receive credit, recommendations or certificates, you must volunteer at least 75 hours of time.
  • All prospective volunteers must return the required paperwork to the volunteer office prior to interviews.

Learn more about how to have a rewarding volunteer experience.

Art Exhibit Showcases Talent of UMMC Staff

In 2013, the University of Maryland Medical Center’s C2X Healing Arts Team and the National Arts Program co-sponsored the hospital’s first employee art exhibition. In response to the overwhelmingly positive feedback, this year’s exhibit will remain open two weeks longer than the 2013 exhibition, giving patients, visitors and employees alike extra time to view these one-of-a-kind pieces. The art will remain mounted in the Weinberg Atrium through Nov. 5.

This year’s exhibition features 192 pieces of artwork by UMMC staff and their families, a significant increase in participants from the previous year. Hospital staff from nearly every service area contributed projects, including submissions from 34 artists who contributed to last year’s display.

 

The artists submitted a wide selection of works, including paintings, photography, crafts, sketches, mixed media and various forms of sculpture. A notable number of submissions carry a distinctive Baltimore theme. “These artists have immeasurable talent, and we are fortunate to showcase their work in our hallways,” said Rachel Hercenberg, supervisor of oncology operations for the Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center.

Baltimore artists Cinder Hypki, Will Williams and Robert McClintock returned from the previous year to judge the competition and presented awards to the winning artists at a ceremony on October 2. Hypki, a community artist and faculty member in the MFA Program in Community Arts at MICA, explores art and ritual as a means of overcoming loss or pain. She has assisted the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in the cultivation of healing art for over five years. Williams is a MICA graduate with a background in fine arts, illustration and portrait painting. His award-winning work is featured in Massachusetts and Maryland galleries. McClintock is a self-taught visionary and combines photography and digital painting into iconic representations of Baltimore. He is a three-time finalist at MacWorld’s annual juried digital art competition.

The judges distributed $2,400 in National Arts Program awards to 21 winning artists from five categories: Youth, Teen, Adult Amateur, Adult Intermediate and Adult Professional. McClintock also presented a special Best in Show award to a 7-year-old recipient. Black-and-white photography and modern paintings featured prominently among the wining pieces. After the closing of the exhibit in November, the People’s Choice Award will be presented to the artist with the most votes from exhibition guests. UMMC employees and visitors can vote by placing their ballot in the box on the exhibit’s glass display case.

The award ceremony featured a guitar prelude by Matt Peroutka, a member of UMMC’s Integrative Care Team and C2X Healing Arts Team. Following the awards, guests enjoyed refreshments – hors d’oeuvres and piano-shaped cookies – while Baltimore jazz pianist Lieutenant Israel Cross gave the 100th performance on the hospital’s piano.

The C2X Healing Arts Team, led by Hercenberg, is composed of hospital employees who are dedicated to using art for healing and wholeness. Kerry Sobol, MBA, RN, director of patient experience and the Commitment to Excellence program for UMMC, and Marianne Rowan Braun, director and vice president of the Commitment to Excellence program and patient experience, oversee and mentor the group. The C2X Healing Arts Team sponsors the yearly Healing Arts Exhibit and coordinates musical performances in the Healing Garden.

The 2014 Healing Arts Exhibit award winners are:

Best in Show

  • Isabel Mena, 7 (Daughter of Christine Mena, RN, Nurse ROP Coordinator, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit): “Scary”

Youth (12 and Under)

  • First place: Ethan Luu, 9 (Son of Rosanna Dinh, RN, Nurse Medication Diversion Specialist, Pharmacy): “Happy Koi”
  • Second Place: Anna Eyler, 7 (Daughter of Kristin Eyler, MPT, Senior Physical Therapist, Rehabilitation Services): “Fireworks over the city”
  • Third Place: Braydon Barski, 9 (Son of Sharon Barski, AS, Student Nurse, Pediatric Hematology and Oncology): “Super Heroes”
  • Honorable Mention: Lara Therese Eugenio, 12 (Daughter of Lovella Eugenio, BSN, CNOR, Senior Clinical Nurse I, General Operating Room): “My Dog”

Teen (13-18)

  • First place: Taylor Motley, 18 (Daughter of Jennifer Motley, BSN, PCCN, Senior Clinical Nurse II, Multi Trauma Intermediate Care Unit): “Hay Stacks”
  • Second Place: Christopher Fieden, 17 (Son of Mary Fieden, RN, Clinical Nurse II, Bone Marrow Transplant Unit): “Easy Rider”
  • Third Place: Grant Zopp, 15 (Son of Joan Zopp, OTR/L, Advanced Occupational Therapist, Psychiatric Occupational Therapy, 12 West and Harbor City Unlimited): “Self Portrait”
  • Honorable Mention: Leena Singh, 13 (Daughter of Ila Mulasi, MD, Assistant Clinical Professor, Family and Community Medicine): “Teapot”

Adult Amateur

  • First place: Laura White (RN, OCN, Senior Clinical Nurse I, Stoler Pavilion, Marlene & Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center): “Chincoteague Wild”
  • Second Place: Sarah Connolly (Daughter of Mary Ellen Connolly, NP, Nurse Practitioner, Pediatrics): “Untitled”
  • Third Place: Yoav Bachrach (Husband of Christine Bachrach, MS, CHC-F, Chief Compliance Officer, Corporate Compliance): “Cedar Bowl – Imperfection Makes Beauty”
  • Honorable Mention: Matthew Smith (MLIS, Assistant Director of Prospect Research & Management, University of Maryland Medical System Foundation): “Jordanian Sunrise”

Adult Intermediate

  • First place: Adrian Rugas (Husband of Marianne Rugas, RN, Clinical Nurse II, Cardiac Surgery Stepdown ): “Gilded”
  • Second Place: Stephanie Heydt (MT (ASCP), Medical Laboratory Scientist, Blood Bank): “Sulking”
  • Third Place: Rupal Mehta (MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology): “Man with Stool”
  • Honorable Mention: Nadia Gavrilova (MD, Resident, Family Medicine): “The Healing Garden: Orchids. Life finds a way to thrive”

Adult Professional

  • First Place: Deborah Kommalan (Mother of Martha Hoffman, RN, BSN, CNOR, Senior Clinical Nurse I, Perioperative Services ): “Make Lemonade”
  • Second Place: Linda Praley (Creative Director, Communications and Public Affairs): “Untitled 1”
  • Third Place: Annemarie DiCamillo (Daughter of Jennifer DiCamillo, Critical Care Pediatric Transport Clinical Nurse II, Maryland ExpressCare): “Tough Faith”
  • Honorable Mention: Karen Trimble (Wife of Kimball Cutler, LCSW-C, Program Coordinator, Program of Assertive Community Treatment ): “English Sky”