Living Legacy Foundation Donates iPhones to Bridge Program to Help Domestic Violence Victims

Bridge Program members with Tiffiny of the Living Legacy Foundation, who facilitated the donation.

A phone is something many of us take for granted. However, to victims and survivors of domestic violence, a phone serves as their only connection to support and services to help break the cycle. Cell phones often are a target during the escalation of domestic violence, and unfortunately, cost is often a limiting factor in victim and survivor access to phones when a new one is needed.

To help provide this lifeline to those in need, employees at the Living Legacy Foundation donated 26 iPhones to The Bridge Program at the University of Maryland R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center.

The Bridge Program is a domestic violence intervention program that operates 24/7. Clinical team members across Shock Trauma, UMMC, and the campus of University of Maryland, Baltimore screen every incoming patient for domestic violence. If someone is flagged, the Bridge Program hotline is called and a case manager will appear at the bedside within an hour. The Bridge Program then helps each client over time by providing assessment, crisis intervention, advocacy, education and counseling along with linking patients to the best resources in his or her community.

Members of the Center for Injury Prevention and Policy with representaitons from the Living Legacy Foundation

Oftentimes, clients of the Bridge Program will also use pay as you go phones, which are often thrown away after the minutes are used up. This presents a problem for the Bridge Program team when trying to contact the client to assist and follow up.

“For our domestic violence survivors, their phones serve as a lifeline to everything that’s important to them,” Ann Myers, RN, Program Coordinator, said. “Anything, like these iPhones, that help us connect to our survivors goes a very long way towards helping more survivors.”

In FY2017, the Bridge Program assisted 368 domestic violence survivors.

For more information or to contact the Bridge Program, please call 410-328-9833.

Shock Trauma’s Violence Intervention Specialists Help Break the Cycle and Change Lives After Violent Injury

It’s heard in the news cycle pretty often in Baltimore – the victim of a gunshot wound or stabbing is taken to Shock Trauma, where they survive their injuries.

However, it’s NOT often you hear about what happens to these survivors. How are they recovering from their injuries, mentally and emotionally? What are our teams doing to help them get access to resources to avoid violent injury again?

That’s where Leonard Spain and David Ross come in.  They’re both Violence Intervention Case Managers at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center.  Anytime someone suffers a violent injury and survives their injuries at Shock Trauma, they are seen by Spain and Ross.

Spain and Ross work to connect victims of violence with resources to get them on the path to success – including employment and schooling opportunities, mental health support, legal assistance and more.

Cut from the Same Cloth

Leonard Spain grew up in West Baltimore and, as a young man, was involved in the drug trade.

“The population that we serve – I was them. I sold drugs, I was a victim of gun violence and I spent time in prison,” Spain says.

That time in prison is what caused Spain to change his way of seeing things. When he arrived home, Spain realized the lack of resources available to help people like him get back on their feet.

He went to several career and job centers, attended job fairs and tried to do everything he could to stay out of trouble. After working a temp job for minimum wage for three years, Spain knew he wanted more for him and his daughter.

He enrolled at Sojourner Douglass College and received his Bachelor’s Degree in Human Services. He always knew he wanted to get into violence intervention and came to Shock Trauma after an internship with the Baltimore City Health Department.

When approaching patients at the beside, Spain focuses on building a relationship with patients as the first step of starting the case management process.

“I try to let them know I am just like them, just not out on the streets anymore,” Spain says. “Sometimes I gotta pull my shirt up and say ‘I got bullet holes just like you.’”

Poetry in Motion

Ross, also a Baltimore native, is a spoken word artist by trade.  He was discovered by the Shock Trauma team after performing at an anti-violence rally at Mondawmin Mall.

At first, Ross was a volunteer with the hospital with another friend.  By commission, he would come and talk with victims of violence and worked with the peer support group.  He then rose to his current position.

Now, when Ross learns of a new potential client, he will get background information on social media and online court records before meeting with them at the bedside.

“I’ll have that information in the back of my mind, but my next step is to speak and have a conversation with them and get their perspective,” Ross says.

Ross says he likes to ask the clients what they would like to gain from the situation and what they see as barriers.

“It’s not an easy thing to get them to trust you, and I understand that completely,” Ross says. “We’re usually asking them to change major aspects of their lives – and it definitely has to be broken down so we can work on one thing at a time.”

Usually, Ross starts with helping his clients get registered for health insurance so they can get their medication and get healthy. Next, they tackle employment. If it’s a criminal record holding the client back, they work to see if anything can be expunged. If it’s the lack of formal education, he works to get them in a GED class to receive a high school diploma at the least.

“I try to remove the obstacles to get them from point A to B,” Ross says. “Then, once we get them to point B, we see what other obstacles we can remove to get them to C.”

Spain and Ross both acknowledge that they are asking their clients to make massive life changes with not many resources, but overall, know it’s worth the trouble in the long run.

Spain is getting his Master’s in Conflict Resolution in University of Baltimore, and Ross is working towards his Master’s in Social Work at the University of Maryland, Baltimore.

Learn more about Shock Trauma Center’s for Injury Prevention and Policy.

Giving Back to The Hospital That Gave A Family So Much

Guest Blog By: Deb Montgomery, University of Maryland Children’s Hospital Parent

My daughter, Neriah, has had many varied health issues over the course of her childhood, including severe asthma, allergies, gastrointenstinal issues, and more. We have been blessed to have her under the care of several of the doctors in the Pediatric Specialty Clinic at the University of Maryland Childnre’s Hospital (UMCH). During the past several years, we’ve been through a multitude of appointments, testing, and hospitalizations.

As you can imagine, this has been really hard, and especially heartbreaking to see all that our little girl had to endure. Good care from doctors and nurses helped, but it was hard to keep positive and distract our sweet girl from all of the pain and discomfort. In some of the toughest medical tests and hospitalizations, we were introduced to the Child Life program.

Through that, she was given some toys and crafts to keep her busy, and distract her a bit from what was going on. It was such a help to have someone else “on our side”, trying to make the whole hospital ordeal a more positive experience for our little girl! When she got home from different times in the hospital, she would show her sisters some crafts that she made, or little presents she got to keep. She never told stories about the hard stuff, but she focused on those fun, positive memories! We really appreciate the positive memories that she has of the hospital, through the Child Life program.

It’s because of that, that we would like to help more children in the hospital to go home with some positive memories! We know how much it means to get some help at some of the hardest times. Our little girl loves to read, and we are having a book drive to raise money to buy Usborne books and more for the Child Life program to give to kids at UMCH. Usborne books are really engaging and interactive, and would really help to bring some joy to a child in the hospital. Usborne will match your donation at 50%, so we’ll be able to get even more books to the children! Click through the link below to donate to the fundraiser, to take part in giving some wonderful books to children in the hospital at UMCH!
Click here to support Provide books to children in the hospital at UMCH

Working Hard to Engage West Baltimore Communities

Members from UMMC’s Community and Workforce Development and Commitment to Excellence teams visited Mr. Barnett’s 5th grade class at James McHenry Elementary/Middle School.

The team dropped off 32 book bags (one for each student) filled with books and school supplies. Students also received holiday toys, donated by UMMC employees and staff. Additionally, through UMMC Commitment to Excellence holiday “Give Back Campaign”, UMMC employees and staff donated socks, undershirts, underwear, and other under garments to James McHenry Elementary/Middle School’s Uniform Closet.

UMMC has officially “adopted” this class, and will be closely working with them to provide mentoring, professional development and engagement opportunities. The UMMC community will continue to work with these students through middle school, high school, college and beyond!

This is just one example of how UMMC is continually working to improve the lives of those in its surrounding communities. UMMC aims to identify and address critical issues in West Baltimore by building permanent relationships with individuals and organizations in the area.

Some other UMMC initiatives include:

  • Launching the Stanford Living Well/Chronic Disease Management Program.
  • Implementing the BHEC Baltimore City-wide Community Health Work Training Certificate Program.
  • Sponsoring 50 youth in the 2017 Youth Works Internship program.
  • Initiating meetings with West Baltimore community organizations to introduce new CEO and re-establish collaborative relationships.

 

Learn more about UMMC’s community engagement efforts on our website: http://umm.edu/community

 

Protect Your Skin This Summer

By Kirsten Bannan, System Communications Intern

As the summer progresses the initial sunburn has faded and it’s time to think about protecting your skin. Everyone wants that bronze glow that comes with a summer tan, but most people are sun picnot aware of the damage the sun can cause to your skin and your health. Here are some facts and tips that will help you protect your skin this summer.

Skin Cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. Most skin cancers are caused by exposure to Ultraviolet (UV) rays. The sun emits these rays and you can get extra exposure from using tanning beds or sun lamps. “People who use tanning salons are 2.5 times more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma, and 1.5 times more likely to develop basal cell carcinoma. According to recent research, first exposure to tanning beds in youth increases melanoma risk by 75 percent” (Skin Cancer Foundation). There are two types of UV radiation that affect the skin: UVA and UVB. Both kinds of rays can cause skin cancer, weaken the immune system, contribute to premature aging of the skin, and cataracts (See our Cataract Awareness Article).

UVA Rays– they are not absorbed by the ozone layer and penetrate skin to contribute to premature aging. “They account for up to 95 percent of the UV radiation reaching the Earth’s surface” (Skin Cancer Foundation). UVA is the prevalent tanning ray; tanning itself is actually damage to the skin’s DNA. The Skin gets darker in an attempt to protect from further DNA damage.

UVB Rays– they are partially absorbed by the ozone layer and are the primary cause to sunburn. They play a very large role in the development of skin cancer. The most intensive UVB rays hit the Earth around 10am to 4pm from April to October.

There are protective measures that you can take to prevent against damage and skin cancer. Since the sun can damage your skin in as few as 15 minutes, it’s important to put sunscreen on when you know you will be outside for an extended period of time. Sunscreen works by absorbing, reflecting, or scattering sunlight. They contain chemicals that interact with the skin to protect it from UV rays.
Here are some other tips from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on sun safety:

A wet T-shirt offers much less UV protection than a dry one, and darker colors may offer more protection than lighter colors.

A regular T-shirt has an SPF rating lower than 15, so use other types of protection as well.

Sunglasses protect your eyes from UV rays and reduce the risk of cataracts. They also protect the tender skin around your eyes from sun exposure.

o Sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays offer the best protection. Most sunglasses sold in the United States, regardless of cost, meet this standard. Wrap-around sunglasses work best because they block UV rays from sneaking in from the side.

SPF. Sunscreens are assigned a sun protection factor (SPF) number that rates their effectiveness in blocking UV rays. Higher numbers indicate more protection. You should use a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15.

Reapplication. Sunscreen wears off. Put it on again if you stay out in the sun for more than two hours and after swimming, sweating, or toweling off.

Cosmetics. Some makeup and lip balms contain some of the same chemicals used in sunscreens. If they do not have at least SPF 15, don’t use them by themselves.

Sunscreen is one of the best ways of protecting yourself from the sun’s harmful rays. Make sure to get a sunscreen that protects against UVA and UVB rays. Sunscreen labels that have “Broad Spectrum” means they protect against both kinds of rays. You also want to make sure to know the difference between “water resistant” and “waterproof”. The American Cancer Society says that “No sunscreens are waterproof or “sweat proof,” and manufacturers are no longer allowed to claim that they are. If a product’s front label makes claims of being water resistant, it must specify whether it lasts for 40 minutes or 80 minutes while swimming or sweating”. They recommend reapplying every two hours and even sooner if you are sweating or swimming.

No matter what summer activities you have planned this summer, make sure you protect your skin from the sun’s harmful rays. It takes 2 minutes to apply sunscreen and that can help save you from a lifetime of skin damage or even skin cancer.

Take a Sun Safety IQ Quiz from the American Cancer Society:
http://www.cancer.org/healthy/toolsandcalculators/quizzes/sun-safety/index’

Sources:
http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/basic_info/sun-safety.htm
https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/documents/sunscreen.pdf
http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/radiationexposureandcancer/uvradiation/uv-radiation-avoiding-uv
http://www.cancer.org/cancer/news/features/stay-sun-safe-this-summer
http://www.skincancer.org/prevention/uva-and-uvb

Pediatric Residents at Univeristy of Maryland Reach Out and Read

A string of rainy days in Baltimore made Friday the perfect day to stay inside and read a good book. And thanks to the efforts of some hard-working Pediatric Residents at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, more than 200 students in Baltimore City had a new story to read!

Throughout the morning, the pediatricians-to-be visited several schools in the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital community, including James McHenry Elementary-Middle School and Franklin Square Elementary in West Baltimore. They spent time interacting with the students, with the hopes of promoting a healthy attitude toward development and literacy at a young age.

James McHenry students had a special visitor: Baltimore City Council President Jack Young handed out books and spent time reading to four classrooms of Pre-K and Kindergarten students.

The Maryland Book Bank and the Maryland Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics donated the 200 books that went home with students.

The day of reading was a part of a nationwide “ROAR: Reach Out and Read” effort, which is a non-profit that works to incorporate books and literacy into pediatric care.

Friday was also designated as a “Call to Action” Day by the American Academy of Pediatrics to F.A.C.E Poverty: promote Food Security, Access to Health Care, Community, and Education.

Celebrating Unsung Superheroes: Social Workers

By: Allie Ondrejcak, Communications Intern

“Never be afraid to do what’s right, especially if the health and happiness of another person or an animal is at stake. The punishments of the society are small compared to the damage we inflict on our soul when we look the other way and do nothing.” – Martin Luther King, Jr.

The profession of social work follows this mission: enhance human well-being and help people meet their basic human needs—particularly the needs and empowerment of people who are vulnerable, oppressed or living in poverty. At the University of Maryland Medical Center, this population is served by the Department of Social Work. The Department helps patients with complex psychosocial needs such as: lack of resources, limited family support, communication barriers or maladjustment to illness. The Department of Social Work believes that recognizing the relationship between social and emotional factors is an important aspect of helping patients. And, because they are aware of the relationship, they are able to understand how it impacts illness.social-work-7

Here at UMMC, social work has been an integral part of the care system since the early 20th century! The first Department of Social Work at the University Hospital was established in 1919. At that time the Department saw every patient who came to the hospital as they were admitted and they provided follow-up and home visits to all patients after discharge. These measures helped to prevent recurrence of illness and readmission to the hospital. Over the years, the Department grew to include teaching programs, casework discussions, community outreach and hospital-wide policies and procedures. Today, the Department is committed to promoting education, professional development and research, all of which are part of the commitment to excellence in medical social work. The Department of Social Work also oversees Palliative Care, Pastoral Care Services and the Patient Advocacy Department at UMMC.

I spoke with UMMC’s Social Work Manager, Catherine Miller, LCSW-C, and asked her to give me a closer look at the department. Here is an overview of what they do and why they are special:

  • Social workers at UMMC start their days at 9:00AM—often much earlier—with Interdisciplinary Rounds (social workers, doctors and nurses use their clinical expertise to coordinate patient care and discuss patients’ discharge). During these rounds, social workers meet with patients and families to prepare for discharge and to assess psychosocial barriers for a patient’s discharge. Oftentimes, social workers work with the outpatient population as well.
  • In addition to the complex needs of patients in hospitals and the psychological impact of hospitalization and injury, medical social workers have to know about all other facets of social work, such as family, community and child social work. These professionals have to work extremely fast to build relationships with patients because they may only get to meet with them a few times, sometimes less!

Ms. Miller explained that being a social worker at UMMC is very rewarding because they are able to help patients and family work through the most important events in their lives—from the joys of birth to the sorrows of death.

The Department is full of dedicated professionals but Ms. Miller wants to recognize a few “shining stars!”

  • Iris Smith—retiring in March after 45 YEARS of Social Work service at UMMC!
    • She was here when the first patient with HIV was treated at UMMC
    • Smith also was here during the Civil Rights movement
  • Justin Perry, Shannon Mullins and Crystal Johnson who have been vital in assisting with the Department’s restructuring with Care Management.
  • Kathy Klein, Chelsea Needle and Carlyn Mast, three social workers who worked very hard to plan the department’s first Social Work Month and organized an information booth at the hospital.

These amazing staff members are part of an equally amazing team. I know first-hand that social workers are passionate, committed and often underappreciated professionals. Social work is dear to my heart because my sister, a licensed clinical social worker, has dedicated her life to helping those who need it most. My sUM_School_SocialWork_RGB_webister earned her degree from the University of Maryland School of Social Work and has worked as a child and family therapist for a non-profit organization and as a Child Protective Services agent. She is now a Behavioral Health Case Manager for a hospital and works with their Outpatient Program. The passion she has for helping those who are too vulnerable to help themselves and her commitment to fairness and justice is so apparent. These values are in the hearts of all dedicated social workers and the world needs more people like this! Our Social Workers here at UMMC exemplify these traits every day in their work with patients and families.

You can reach the UMMC Department of Social Work at 410-328-6700 their hours of operation are Monday-Friday, 8:00 am – 4:30 pm. The Department also provides after-hour referrals, weekend in-house coverage in Shock Trauma and both the Adult and Pediatric Emergency Departments and on-call service.

Thank you to all social workers and a special thank you to our very own social workers at UMMC for all that you do! The world is a better place because of you!

Art Against Violence 2016 Gallery Show Now Accepting Submissions

Calling all Baltimore City School students!

The University of Maryland R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center’s Violence Prevention Program is now accepting submissions for the Art Against Violence 2016 Gallery Show.

Students may submit visual art of any medium through April 1st. The theme is Art Against Violence, but any artwork inspired by this theme is acceptable.

The Gallery Show coincides with National Youth Violence Prevention Week, which runs April 4-8th. This week has been celebrated since 2001, and aims to raise awareness of and help reduce youth violence in communities everywhere.

A panel of judges will attend and present special awards. Winners across other categories will be decided by popular vote.

The 2016 gallery show will be held April 6th from 4-8pm, with an award ceremony at 6:30pm.

Medical School Teaching Facility Atrium, 685 W. Baltimore St.

Members of the Violence Prevention Program are able to pick up artwork or give a brief presentation to interested students. Please contact Erin Walton at erinwalton@umm.edu or 410-328-6078 to schedule a pick-up or presentation.

Learn more about the show here: https://artagainstviolence2016.wordpress.com/

AAV

Previous Winner

Ear, Nose & Throat Team Returns from Medical Mission after Cyclone Winston Rocks Fiji


A 12-person team of nurses, surgeons, residents and anesthesiologists from the University of Maryland Medical Center have returned from their medical mission in Fiji.   Team members performed 15 surgeries and saw 150 patients before Tropical Cyclone Winston rocked the islands.   Watch the video above to hear about the mission from the team themselves.

 

Brushing Twice a Day Keeps Decay Away – National Children’s Dental Health Month

By Zuryna Smith, System Communications Intern

Little boy teethNational Children’s Dental Health Month was introduced by the American Dental Association as a way to provide crucial information regarding oral health in children.

It started as a one-day event in Cleveland. As the importance of the issue of oral health became more prevalent, the one-day event spanned across a week and eventually became a month-long event that garnered global attention.

The ADA provides health fairs, free dental screenings, and other activities that promote the adoption of healthy oral health techniques.  This year’s campaign slogan is entitled “Sugar Wars,” a spin on the sci-fiction film Star Wars.

Tooth decay and loss is one of the main oral health issues that affect children. Preventative care is the only way to deter the loss of teeth. The rule of thumb is to brush two times a day for two minutes each time. In addition to proper brushing techniques, parents should be vigilant in their efforts to keep their children’s teeth shiny and healthy.

Here are a few tips that will encourage healthy dental habits:

  • Emphasize the importance of fluoride. Fluoride is a natural chemical that prevents decay and strengthens the enamel of teeth. It can be found in tap water and is also available as a supplement.
  • A healthy and balanced diet is a necessity in order to prevent tooth decay. While starches and fruits are essential to a child’s diet, certain foods need to be given in moderation. Starchy and sticky foods tend to stay on the child’s teeth and cause cavities as well as decay.
  • Daily cleaning should take place as soon as the child develops their first tooth. A small piece of gauze or a damp cloth can be used to clean the tooth. As the child gets older a toothbrush with a small amount of fluoride toothpaste should be used.

Dental sealants are another method of prevention for young children. Dental sealants are small, plastic coatings that cover the chewing surfaces of the back teeth. It helps to prevent excess food and germs from getting caught in the crevices of the teeth.

Childrens teeth

University of Maryland School of Dentistry students participated in an outreach program where they provided free sealant treatments to children in need at the Perryville Clinic. The overall purpose of the event was to provide assistance and education to those who would not normally have access to proper dental care providers.

For more information about an upcoming Sealant Saturday event please contact the Perryville Clinic at 410-706-4900.

Pediatric Dental Appointments are available at the University of Maryland Pediatric Dental Clinic by calling 410-706-4213. You can also search for a Dental Health provider by using our website.